ata carnet

Discussion in 'General Discussion / News / Information' started by nwo, Mar 23, 2004.

  1. nwo

    nwo New Member


    please explain how is it possible to get an ata carnet from thailand if i buy a bike from there and want to continue on to other countries which accept only carnet. What documents do I need? How much does it cost? How long will it take?


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  3. john

    john Ol'Timer

    nwo, where are you going to be traveling to? You will not need a Carnet for Laos or Cambodia and at this time you can't get a bike into Burma. All you nned to go into Laos or Cambodia is a copy of your registration or in Thailand it is called a "Tabian". Make sure you get the "Tabian" (The book) when you buy your bike. If you re going else where maybe someone else will have info. I have not met anyone who has gotten a Carnet in Thailand. JOHN
  4. nwo

    nwo New Member

    thanks John

    but i'm afraid I need the carnet at least in South-Korea. So if anybody can suggest a company or an agent of some kind... I mean if I buy a bike from Thailand means that I already pay my share of taxes and everything and if it is registered and legal and all... it should be possible to get a carnet? shouldn't it? or does it count that my nationality is ... well ... not Thai?

  5. DavidFL

    DavidFL Administrator Staff Member

    I suspect that you might be “Just fishing” with your post.
    If you go to ... ntries.htm
    You will see a list of countries that have signed the Int'l Carnet agreement.
    Neither Thailand nor South Korea appears to be listed.
    So it may be difficult
    (1) To get one issued in Thailand, especially if you are not a local living in Thailand; however, the web site for the Royal Thai Automobile association is and they might be able to help you.
    (2) To get into South Korea as they aren’t listed as a signatory either.
    If you go to ... netExplain
    You will see an explanation of how Carnet de Passage works.
    If you go to ... he_AIT.htm
    You will see a full run down on how it works.

    Note too that the document is called a “Carnet de passage,” not an ATA (Admission Temporaire – Temporary Admission) that is a customs document for temporary import of goods (not vehicles.) If you go to ... enuNme=ATA
    You will see a run down on ATA in Thailand.

    I hope this is help and you learn how the Carnet system works.

    Keep the power on
  6. nwo

    nwo New Member

    Thanks David

    but I'm a bit confused... The other sites explaining how ATA Carnet works also include motor vehicles in the list
    and so does the link to Thai customs (means of transport).

    Also both, Korea and Thailand seem to be listed as the members of carnet agreement and this is also confirmed on their customs websites and was also confirmed by their customs officers when I called them, they also insisted that this is the ONLY possibility for temporarily importing a vehicle to their country. Unfortunately they had no idea how to get one. A very helpful female voice from the Thai chamber of commerce tried to explain me that this is something that transportation companies should deal with but did not know any. But none of the companies I contacted was aware of it... if they even understood what I wanted.

    After spending lots of money on phone calls and explaining my problem to almost every worker of these transport companies until they hanged up, put on the music or forwarded my call to the next worker I eventually gave up and hoped that I get some help from here. So I wouldn’t say I’m just “fishing with my post”

  7. DavidFL

    DavidFL Administrator Staff Member

    If I understand correctly, and I could well be wrong,
    1. To get a carnet you will need to put up a sizeable bond with a local Thai bank. The exact amount will be decided by the issuing authority.
    2. The issuing authority in Thailand is most likely the Royal Thai Automobile Association.
    3. If you're not a Thai national my guess is that it will be difficult for you to do, although not impossible.
    4.The bike will need to be a legal registered Thai bike with a number plate.
    5. It is going to cost you several thousand dollars to set up, and from the tone of your posts I get the impression that you aren’t a person who will pay this, or to follow it through.
    6. If indeed you do follow it through, and get a Carnet, then please be kind enough to share the info with us, to at least prove me wrong.

    Keep the power on

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