BMW R1100GS FOR SALE

Discussion in 'Motorcycle Buy and Sell' started by skattis, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. skattis

    skattis Member

    1998 GS1100 for sale: Marrakesh Red/Alpine White - BMW engine crash bars - BMW system side cases and tank bag - New Metzeler Tourance tyres - 49000 kilometer - The bike is in excellent condition. Comes with green book (registered in Chonburi).
    40k service last year at Barcelona Motor in BKK.
    Touratech equipments:
    - Light and oil cooler ptotector
    - Handprotectors
    - Senter stand guard
    - Steering stopper
    - Gearbox reinforcement

    280.000,- baht or best offer
    The bike is located in Pattaya.
    Enquiries to: [email email=jtskatt@online.no]jtskatt@online.no[/email]
    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi Friend,

    Please watch your mail, I already answered you.

    Have great fun.
     
  4. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

    Where was the photo taken? I'd like to go there...

    If I'm correct in believing that you've already sold the bike, you can thank me - I'm the one who forwarded the listing at dawn this morning!

    Good luck to you all...

    S.
     
  5. skattis

    skattis Member

    Thanks for your help NDSinBKK.
    The photo is taken on Koh Chang.

    Jan
     
  6. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

    Thanks for the info on the location, it'll be fun to take a run down there (I also ride a GS.)

    I was kidding about the "thanks" part, but I do hope all works out well on the sale.

    S.
     
  7. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi Friend,

    If you haven't sold the bike yet, please call me at 0871024826, I am interested but transaction have to happen before Saturday at the latest. So that's pretty urgent.

    If I may what is the reason for this sale and what is the ownership history ? Where does the bike comes from, bought brand new, how many owner till now ?
     
  8. skattis

    skattis Member

    This is the history I know about the bike:
    I met the first owner at Phuket Bike Week in April this year.
    This Thai man told me that he imported the bike from Japan with only 3000km on the meter.
    He owned the the bike for some years and sell it with about 30000km on the meter.
    The next owner was a Thai man who only used it a few thousand kilometers, and I buy the bike from him in January 2007.
     
  9. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi Friend,

    As PM and written on the board, I'm interested by your bike (please refer to my PM) however, again time is coming short and if you do not reply quicker, it will be off as I'll return to the mine in few days... What is your position ?
     
  10. gobs

    gobs Ol'Timer

    Hi camarade Azoulay,

    What's up with your intent to "buy" this 1100 GS?
    Looks like a good one... At a good price after little bargain IMHO...

    Cheers
     
  11. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi Friend Gobs,

    Totally agree with you, and fully in my magnitude of price and consideration, issue is that I return to Europe this week (to the Mine) and it will be too short for me to make the deal.

    I wrote it already to Skattis who, then, told me:

    -he is in Norway
    -the bike at SIAM Motorbike in Pattay
    -the Green Book in his Pattaya's house...

    All that seems a bit to complicated for me even if the bike would be OK (I have to check it first) and the price agreed (from the last PM, we are reaching an agreement).

    Again a missed opportunity, at least for me. I'll pick up your word, Tomorrow will be an other day.....
     
  12. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi Friend,

    Please watch your mail, I already answered you.

    Have great fun.

    URGENT !
     
  13. gobs

    gobs Ol'Timer

    Sorry for you Azoulay...

    If I was settled in Pat or BKK, I should be pleased to help you, camarade... But I live in Chiang Mai: that's not "the door nearby"!

    How long have you to stay in France? Maybe coming back in LOS the bike should be still for sale... Nowadays, the market is not very active for this kind of big bike...
    I sincerly hope that for you, camarade.

    Bon voyage et bon séjour "par là-bas" :wink:

    Cheers
     
  14. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Camarade Gobs,

    Thanks for your very friendly answer, yes that's a pitty I can't go to Pattaya, being short of time at present and moving between BKK and Cha-Am where I just aquired a new house.

    I'll be returning on this Thursday to France and won't have time at all to travel to Pattaya.

    It's a pitty as well as I am pretty sure that Scott from SIAM MC would have be able to organise the transport and the sale from Pattaya to Bangkok where I live most of the time (in LOS, this kind of service is quite normal on sale).

    Anyway, I am returning to LOS for X'Mas, and I'll see if the bike would be still there. This was exactly the range of price and the bike I was looking for, specially if it was in good conditions as described...

    Do you have any idea why this kind of bike is not so popular at present ?

    Anyway thanks again for your kind post and if once you come to BKK around Suvanabummi or Cha-Am, let me know I could be around and would be delighted to meet you.
     
  15. chiangmairich

    chiangmairich Ol'Timer

    Just out of interest it is virtually impossible to register a large bike (in your name) in Pattaya if you live in a another province as the office there requires a Statement of Residence from the Immigration office,and if you do not have a pattaya address they will not issue this B@#Sht peice of paper and the wheel goes around.
    I hope there is someone that knows a way around this.
     
  16. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

    Uh, maybe I'm missing something, but it seems to me perfectly normal in any country in the world that you can't register a vehicle in a city/province/state/take-your-pick where you don't have a legally established residence.

    My out-of-the-box solution to this "problem" would be to register the vehicle in the province where you DO live. This is perfectly doable, and in my experience the Thai authorities are quite capable and willing to do this.

    Incidentally, the same problem applies to any other bike, as far as I know. If you buy a bike that is registered in another province, you have to transfer the registration to the one you live in. Even if you don't live there, with a tabiyan baan, there are documents you can obtain that will satisfy the authorities.
     
  17. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

    1. They are very tall and very heavy. Not a lot of short people are ready to take them on.

    2. There's not a huge domestic sub-culture of dual purpose biking.

    3. ANY big bike is a nuisance in Bangkok because of the traffic and the traffic regulations. You can't get on the expressways. You can't use the flyover bridges. You can't effectively split lanes, so you are trapped in the fumes without the advantage of air filtration and cooling. You can't get in the faster lanes.

    4. Given that a large proportion of the people who could afford the expense of a big bike like this are in Bangkok, there's not a lot of immediate gratification on tap...

    5. Fuel prices are a concern, and these things don't do that much better than the average car. So they are truly a toy for those with sufficient discretionary income, other means of transportation, and the confidence to pilot the equivalent of a rhinoceros through hazardous conditions.

    6. BMW's in particular are way on the high end of the pricing scale both because they are BMWs and because they generally have proper registrations - an issue generally of greater concern to farangs than to Thais.

    The above said, I'm a new, short, 1150GS owner, and very enthusiastic about it. But it IS a niche market...

    S.
     
  18. Rhodie

    Rhodie Ol'Timer

    This would appear quite logical and the most appropriate of solutions were it not for our living in "Amazing" Thailand.
    Obviously for totally legal bikes this should present a great problem,
    beyond the hassle of getting all the required paperwork.

    A number of riders owning "grey" imports, but wishing to have registration & green books,
    have been unable to acquire registrations in Chiang Mai,
    where authorities are on the look out for bikes which have been restamped and have recycled greenbooks.

    One solution is to acquire registration books and plates out of Bangkok - costing anywhere between 30-80k.
    This presents a potential problem on resale, as it is quite possible in the current more stringent climate of changing
    and becoming even more difficult of owning a bike with dodgy papers.
    Should things change even further, it has the potential of leaving the owner with an almost unsellable machine.
     
  19. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

    This would appear quite logical and the most appropriate of solutions were it not for our living in "Amazing" Thailand.
    Obviously for totally legal bikes this should present a great problem,
    beyond the hassle of getting all the required paperwork.

    A number of riders owning "grey" imports, but wishing to have registration & green books,
    have been unable to acquire registrations in Chiang Mai,
    where authorities are on the look out for bikes which have been restamped and have recycled greenbooks.

    One solution is to acquire registration books and plates out of Bangkok - costing anywhere between 30-80k.
    This presents a potential problem on resale, as it is quite possible in the current more stringent climate of changing
    and becoming even more difficult of owning a bike with dodgy papers.
    Should things change even further, it has the potential of leaving the owner with an almost unsellable machine.
    I knew I was missing something! Rhodie, You seized on it - I was thinking only of bikes with a proper pedigree, i.e., green book.

    I looked at a LOT of motorcycles before buying the GS, and one of the criteria was that it have a squeaky clean green book, which costs significantly more.

    "Grey" is another word for illegal, which does not come as any surprise to anyone who has one. Thailand has been progressively cutting off the oxygen for that kind of ownership. As you have pointed out, owners, buyers, and sellers need to be aware that they are, indeed, sitting on something that's nearly unsellable. That's not a revelation and I would not blame Thailand for that.

    My advice is to buy bikes that have the proper pedigree, and accept the additional cost that goes with it. If that means buying less bike for the equivalent baht outlay, then so be it - those are the rules of the game.

    Incidentally, Thai people demonstrate on a daily basis that any necessary task from conveyance to cargo hauling can be done with 200cc or less. It is very rare that you see a large displacement bike doing any "work" - they are an indulgence, and they are taxed in a manner that is not dissimilar to the so-called "gas-guzzler" tax put on vehicles sold in the US that don't meet minimum fuel consumption standards. In a world in which climate change is an increasingly big deal, discouraging anything that uses more non-renewable resources than necessary is actually a rational policy. I'm regularly amazed at the new announcements of 600hp, 300+km/hour motorcars...tick tock, tick tock...
     
  20. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi Friends,

    A special thanks to all of you who wrote posts about the bike issue.

    Unfortunatelly or fortunally, as I had to be back to Mine and return to France yesterday, and due to the inertia and lack of energy of the seller to whom I propose few solutions since days to acquire his bike, the deal has finally been not possible.

    However from what I read from ChiangmaiRich, from NDSinBKK, Rhodie and others, you indicated to transfer the papers (Green Book, ...) from Pattaya to an other province ?

    Among the explanations on low popularity of this kind of bike, I did well understood:

    1. That these Bikes are heavy and could be difficult to ride for average Thai people, however being one of these typical "Farangs", this won't be an obstacle, I already ride a Ducati Monster (quite heavy) and a Suzuki DRZ (quite high).

    2. Quote "There's not a huge domestic sub-culture of dual purpose biking." Unquote, I could imagine, specially when I discuss with my Thai Bikker friends, they would prefer a more "specialised" bike. I am still in love with dual purpose bikes, big trails able to run properly as well on road as on tracks. I think a GS is an example of a perfect dual purpose bike I was looking for.

    3. Quote "ANY big bike is a nuisance in Bangkok because of the traffic and the traffic regulations. You can't get on the expressways. You can't use the flyover bridges. You can't effectively split lanes, so you are trapped in the fumes without the advantage of air filtration and cooling. You can't get in the faster lanes." Unquote Initially being a Bangkok resident, I am 500 % in agreement with this: ANY big bike is a nuisance in Bangkok. Bangkok is the nightmare of the Rider and much more than most of other Big Cities I know.

    4. Quote "Given that a large proportion of the people who could afford the expense of a big bike like this are in Bangkok, there's not a lot of immediate gratification on tap..." Unquote Fully right as well, but I was taking into account the secon hand selling price (around 250 KTBH) which is in an affordable range for a toy.

    5. Quote "Fuel prices are a concern, and these things don't do that much better than the average car. So they are truly a toy for those with sufficient discretionary income, other means of transportation, and the confidence to pilot the equivalent of a rhinoceros through hazardous conditions." Unquote Yes, right a toy but I would say better a Hobby, as others and yes, we could consider that Hobbies and Toys are the priviledges of a small range of the population, but this is the same in every countries.

    6. Quote "BMW's in particular are way on the high end of the pricing scale both because they are BMWs and because they generally have proper registrations - an issue generally of greater concern to farangs than to Thais. " Unquote, Obvious for me the very important issue is to own a clean bike for mainly two reasons I already explained several times:

    -a) I don't want to be bored other than for Teamoney with Grey Bikes, the risk could be high if it's turn badly.

    -b) Generally Grey Bike are around stolen bikes and as a Rider, my goodself since years -some 40 years- I don't want to encourage and feed this kind of practice.

    Now I would be very interested by the driving comparaison between 1100 and 1150 Gs, in LOS.

    Thanks again Friends and drive safely in LOS.
     
  21. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

    1. Actually, I think the majority of grey bikes are not stolen, they have been brought in, generally in pieces and reassembled, to avoid paying the duties. The illegality is not necessarily because they are stolen, but because they have been imported in a way that circumvents tax and other regulations. Still, in Thai terms, they are illegal.

    2. I cannot imagine that there's any noticeable difference between the 1100 and the 1150. 1200 should be a bit different, because of the much lighter weight. I personally would avoid the 1200 because it has an electronically activated key that is the source of a lot of inconvenience. The 1150 is the most confidence-inspiring bike I think I've owned/used...

    S.

    S.
     
  22. PSS

    PSS Member

    Awesome Bike .... !!!!!

    :D
     
  23. Azoulay

    Azoulay Ol'Timer

    Hi PSS,

    Esplain bit more what you mean, thanks !
     
  24. PSS

    PSS Member

    Hi AZOULAY

    It's in my list that like it very very much , that's it
     
  25. Rhodie

    Rhodie Ol'Timer

    The R1100GS is a great bike if you are travelling great distances:
    BKK-CNX, BKK-Hat Yai, BKK-Phnom Penh, BKK-Paxse.
    Making all of these possible in one day. BKK-S'pore in 2 days.
    But it is not an off-road bike.
    And, I'd choose it over the 1150, as it is not so lardy.
    I had an 1150GSA in Europe and found it heavy & underpowered.
    The R1200GS overcomes the power/weight issue, but it still is not an off-road bike!
    And in Thailand expect to pay at least twice the money for a 2nd hand example - over a million + boxes etc new.
    If you are doing a lot of tar riding 2-up + gear, then the R1100GS in Thailand is a great bike.
    But try before you buy - as the telelever front end is not to everybody's taste,
    and its size takes some getting used to if you are coming from a smaller bike.
     
  26. NDSinBKK

    NDSinBKK Ol'Timer

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