FREE BEER AGAIN

Discussion in 'General Discussion / News / Information' started by HIKO, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. HIKO

    HIKO Ol'Timer

    From which bike is this beautiful engine? First answer gets a free beer.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Loading...


  3. Marco

    Marco Ol'Timer

    1979 Honda CBX Super Six??
     
  4. penetrator

    penetrator Ol'Timer

    Yep, definitely a CBX 6. The Benelli 6 which was a copy of the honda 4 with a couple of extra cylinders bolted on was only a sohc and the Kwacker Z1300 6 was watercooled. The only other transverse 6's I can think of are the old 50's/60's MV and 60's Honda racers.
     
  5. Think you are right..its deffinatlly a cbx

    mate of mine has one...been parked in a barn for years....

    been trying to get my paws on it for ages.....

    actually............. its up in puhoi.....

    Bungy ians turf....
     
  6. HIKO

    HIKO Ol'Timer

    YES IT IS A CBX SUPER 6 NOT A 1979 MODEL BUT A 1978.

    But anyhow Marco won a beer again but soon I must disqualify Marco since it is not correct that one Finn asks and another Finn answers.

    Anyhow the CBX was developed by Shoichiro Irimajiri who was the young designer behind Honda’s 5 and 6 cylinder legendary racing bikes. He was very clear about the link between the racing bikes and the CBX declaring at the launch of the CBX

    "When we were racing, we were up against four cylinder two-strokes built by Yamaha and Suzuki. Cylinder multiplication was the only way we could be competitive. That’s why we built the five cylinder 125 and the two six cylinder machines. The CBX is a direct descendant of these race engines. That’s one reason why it took only a year and a half to develop. We already had the engine technology from our GP racing experience."

    Another reason for the bike’s very existence was the opening of Honda’s then brand-new R&D centre at Asaka. Having the brightest designers in Japan, and filled with a burning desire to show that Honda occupied the top spot in world wide bike design, the CBX was intended to make it clear just who ruled the bike world.

    The styling was equally dramatic. A team of five chassis engineers and stylists, working under the direction of Norimoto Otsuka, produced one of the most dramatic petrol tanks ever to grace a motorcycle.

    The engine was as already said the work of Shoichiro Irimajri and he made no compromises. 6 cylinders, with 24 valves feeding the motor through the most sophisticated constant velocity carburetors ever made. The engine was also incredibly practical. Despite looking huge, it was only 7 cm wider than the four cylinder Honda CB750 and the tank design did hide the engine. The gearbox was very sweet but the clutch could easily burn if you was not gentle with it. Best of all, producing 103hp at 9,000 rpm, it made the power its looks promised. Enough power in fact to make it the quickest most powerful production bike available with quarter mile times in the mid 11s.

    But everything was not OK. The handling was very poor. The engine was an integrated part of the chassis, the front fork was spindly and a swinging arm which was definitely not conceived by a master engineer. Neither were the rear shocks. Finally, the Dunlop tyres, which the bike came equipped with as standard, did not do the bike any favours. The rear tyre was 4,00 18 and the power was 104 hp….

    But the bike was funny to drive when driving straight. You could make tremendous wheelies, without using the clutch. I bought a new one in 1978 and put a 6-1 exhaust system on it and on Sunday mornings when the police was not yet working I went to drive through a tunnel in the center of Helsinki just to enjoy the sound of the bike, it was marvelous, but I’m not sure that the people who lived at the end of the tunnel liked it as much….

    There are not so many CBX’s left. One reason is that it is damned expensive to repair the engine. The bike also has a special deficit at least on the early models. When you leave the bike on the side stand and forget to close the gasoline it happens that the gasoline leaks into the first cylinder putting a few centiliter of gasoline on the top of the piston. So if you have bad luck the remaining 5 cylinders starts and when the last piston comes up to top end it cannot do it and the crank rod brakes down and find it’s way through the crankcase. And CBX crank cases are not cheap….

    The CBX died quickly, it was only manufactured between 1978-1982. The last models were converted into some kind of Touring version with side carriers and fairing which I think was terrible. CBX is a Sport Bike.

    If somebody needs a CBX I still have one 1978 original for sale in Finland..

    HIKO

    And then some pictures

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  7. Marco

    Marco Ol'Timer

    HIKO, Disqualify me :eek: ...whyyyyy :cry:
    Let's make it clear,, so others know it also,, I dont know you personally, i never met you, i havent even spoke to you, so i dont have advantage on that,, My advantage is that my comp is always open as i work on it and every time some one post something, If im home,, i get noticed, so i start to do my Research and usually find answer with in first 15-30minutes...

    :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink:
     
  8. HIKO

    HIKO Ol'Timer

    OK EI HATAA,

    HIKO
     
  9. Marco

    Marco Ol'Timer

    Hiko

    5555,, I will come to meet you guys down there and claim my beers when i get my beemer fixed (clutch replacement and some cosmetic thing's)

    but that would be maybe by end of may...
     
  10. Interesting stuff hiko..
    have ridden a couple of them....
    one was silver handled ok

    then i rode a red one ............ went like shite.....but the back end was all over the place......
     
  11. chiangmairich

    chiangmairich Ol'Timer

    Good stuff again Hiko,
    I had a 1981 CBX for a few years,was a good fun bike and yep,the handling was fairly dismal but was a favorite to get into a cornerslide around town with that magnificent sound and crap handling was the only fast way around.

    The day I bought it ride 280Km to home,testing it up around 200Kmh+,get 1 Km from home and the rear chain snapped,The dealer replaced the sprockets as I requested on pre-delivery but not the chain...unbeleviable. :x

    Did the repair myself...rather a big job,had to split the cases,parts supplied by local errant Honda dealer and was on my way again,though
    it took a Bl@@dy week just to lap the 24 valves and shim again.

    I still miss that lovely sounding engine..6-6 pipes
     

Share This Page