lights on by daytime a problem in Cambodia?

Discussion in 'Cambodia - General Discussion Forum' started by DutchMike, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. DutchMike

    DutchMike Active Member

    We are planning another trip to Cambodia (as soon as the rain stops) but I noticed last time in Cambodia that traffic police makes an issue of not being able to switch your lights off.
    Is this illegal or just another police trick to generate some extra income?
    When I was stopped for driving with lights in the daytime I showed the lights could not be switched off, and he got rather irritated (and I did not pay).
    I searched the gt-forum but could not find the answer, anybody knows?
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  3. brucegsrider

    brucegsrider Ol'Timer

    Rode from BKK to Siem Reap and Phnom Penh a couple of years ago.
    Had read about the lights issue so took out the headlight fuse in my ER6N.

    Problem was, it left the running lights still on.

    Ignored that, but on getting to the hotel in PP, the concierge came over to me with some black tape to tape them over saying the police would fine me.

    In Asia, doesn't really matter what is law or not........

    Tip.....carry plenty of US$1 notes for "fines".
  4. daewoo

    daewoo Ol'Timer

    I do remember reading a long time ago that the 'no headlights in daylight rule' is a myth, that doesn't exist in traffic law... I looked a bit on the Interwebs, but all sources say that it is illegal - without a source...

    Thought it was the California2 site that said this, but they too write that it is illegal...

    As Bruce above said, whether it is legal or illegal is probably moot - you will be stopped and the cops will want money... you can choose to fight them over it on the side of the road for $1 saving, and maybe win - you can pay the $1, smile, and ride on - or you can pull the fuse (or install a switch) and avoid the hassle...
  5. DutchMike

    DutchMike Active Member

    I saw foreigners riding their bike with taped over headlights. It is not to save a dollar, I am used to paying 'the 100 baht' in Thailand, but was wondering whether everybody knew something I did not know. I'll make a switch under the saddle, no big deal. Thanks for sharing your experience.
  6. DutchMike

    DutchMike Active Member

    Thanks for sharing, I also tried to find the source of this (unofficial) rule (or law), could not find it. BTW, I was only stopped once by the police while I was making a one week tour in Cambodia and passed several checkpoints without raising any interest from their side. I make it a sport not to pay, at least not immediately, just for fun. Just playing the ignorant (smiling) sometimes makes them give up, it worked for this light issue in Battamban. 1 - 0 for me.
  7. RALPH66121

    RALPH66121 Member

    Using lights during daytime WILL get you a ticket, and more annoyingly the stop, the discussion, getting your papers out, time lost and so on. According to a cop who spoke a little English, using lights during daytime is reserved for VIP politicians. (Crap.)

    For people like myself with a BMW R1200 GS, or similar, without taking bulbs out, unplugging bulbs' or so on (from site):
    The procedure is as follows:

    [list type=decimal]
    [*]Turn the ignition on and allow the startup-check cycle to complete. The headlights will be off (this is normal).
    [*]Hold turn-signal cancel switch for 4-5 secs.
    [*]Hold right turn-signal switch for 4-5 secs.
    [*]Start engine.
    [*]Lights should remain OFF.
    [/list type=decimal]
    This will reset next time you switch off the ignition. The headlights will be off, but the running lights and tail light will remain on.

    However, I decided not to use the above procedure but put a dark laminate sheet over my -removable- TOURATECH Lexan headlight protector.

    If I should ride at night -what I rarely do in this part of the world- I just pull of the protecting plate. Takes one second.
  8. Element_6

    Element_6 Member

    I ride an F800GS in Cambodia, usually I pull the block off the back of the headlight but leave the DLR light burning and have never been stopped in 18 months. Many locals have told me I would be but it never happened. I have also driven with the headlight burning frequently and the police have never even given me a second glance. Maybe just lucky.

    I tried the above on my F800GS and it works whilst the bike is stationary but as soon as it starts to move the light comes back on. I ready (for my bike) that the function was just there to allow you to work on the bike without the light not to ride like that. Maybe the bigger bikes are different?
  9. DutchMike

    DutchMike Active Member

    Smart tricks for some bikes to switch the headlights off, but not for the Honda 500. It is however very easy to place a switch (in a convenient spot) cutting the power to the bulb(s). It also serves to switch lights off when working on the engine or when starting the engine with low battery.

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