MTS 1200 assembled in Thailand?!

Discussion in 'Ducati Motorcycles in Thailand' started by nikster, May 12, 2013.

  1. nikster

    nikster Ol'Timer

    I just casually checked the Ducati price list, guess what? The MultiStrada 1200 appears to be assembled in Thailand now, 858k baht. Previously this bike was imported and well over 1M.

    Note that that's cheaper than the assembled-here Diavel!

    Like the Diavel, this bike suffers from two kinds of taxation: 30% excise tax as a CKD (assembled here from imported parts); and 20% for having > 1000cc. The taxes are no doubt cumulative. And 7% VAT of course.

    If it wasn't for that new government tax it would be 100k less... anyway, good news, I guess

    http://ducatithailan...m/pricelist.php
     
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  3. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    yep, assembled in Thailand and delivery started end of April. Received mine a week ago.
    Today Ducati is assembling 3 models in Thailand:

    Monster 795 (Non ABS and ABS)
    Diavel (ABS, Carbon Red and Chromo)
    Multistrada (ABS, S-Touring and Pikes Peak)

    Next bike most probably will be the Hypermotard/Hyperstrada
     
  4. nikster

    nikster Ol'Timer

    Hahaha, I was half expecting you to come in and tell me how I'm wrong. Rather pleased I was right :)

    Congrats on the new bike - which one did you get and care to post some pix?

    Do you have more definite info on the tax situation? Is the Monster 795 also CKD and therefore subject to 30% tax? I mean I know the MTS and Diavel are. But I initially assumed the Monster would be locally built like the Hondas and Kawasakis. The price is more in line with an extra 30% added though.

    Also... the dealer swears a new mini MTS asian version will come soon, do you know anything about that?
     
  5. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    LOL. It seems that you are one of the few guys that comments on Ducati news on GT.

    Thanks but I haven't figured out yet how to attach pics nowadays :huh:. Will have a look again and will post some pics of my MTS very soon. And by the way, I have the base model 1200 with DSP (Ducati Safety Pack, ABS, DTC and ride modes). Oh and the MTS is only available in Red for the Moment.

    Concerning the tax I believe you are spot on. Monster is not locally build but also locally assembled and therefore is subject to the same tax (depending on CCs of course as you mentioned) as the other Ducatis.

    A MTS for the Asian market? I asked Ducati around 2 years ago if they would make a MTS 848 for the Asian Market (assembled in Thailand) and they replied that they thought it would not happen..... Today there is the Hyperstrada 821 which is effectively a mini MTS. I really can't imagine that they will still launch a MTS 821 (or 848 ). Will be too similar to the Hyperstrada.

    ..pics will follow shortly.
     
  6. Ian Bungy

    Ian Bungy Ol'Timer

    Great Bikes the Multistrada. At the Motorshow they Told Us that the Base Model doesn't Have the Sky Hook Suspension. If You want that You have to Pay 1.029.000 Baht or get the Pikes Peak for around 1.150.000? Then You get the Forged Wheel, Exhaust System, all the Carbon parts etc. The Nicest Looking and lightest of the 3 but at a Price!
     
  7. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    Ok let's see if it works..

    <img src=""[​IMG]
     
  8. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    Ian, the exhaust systems on all three models being sold in Thailand is identical (only in Europe the Pikes Peak comes with a Termi slip on). As you mentioned, wheels, panniers, carbon parts and suspension are the main differences between them.

    Engine (electronics)/exhaust wise, they are the same.
     
  9. Ian Bungy

    Ian Bungy Ol'Timer

    The Pikes Peak at the Show had a Termi and that is standard they Told Us? Anyway till Great Bikes at a slightly less price than before! Wish all Bikes would keep dropping! A Friend Brought a New Triumph Tiger 800 XC in the USA for $12500, That's about 1/2 of what it costs here!!!
     
  10. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    You are right, the Pikes Peak which was shown at the BKK Motorshow had the slip on. I thought they told me it had one because it was imported from Europe for the show because the Rayong factory didn't have one ready yet. Ducati confirmed that the local MTSs will have the slip on too. Sorry for that.

    On average prices decrease by 30% for Ducatis if assembled here (taken into account the applicable new tax increase for imported bikes). I am happy with that, makes prices equal to Ducatis being sold in my home country (the prices I am used to).

    And as Nikster said, "If it wasn't for that new government tax it would be 100k less... anyway, good news, I guess"

    <img src=""[​IMG]
     
  11. johnnysneds

    johnnysneds Ol'Timer

    [​IMG]

    Just my 2 cents worth on the MTS. I have owned the 1200S Touring for a year now. Out the box I thought it was crap and had I test rode one before purchasing I probably wouldn't have gone for it. There's alot of emissions/sound restrictions on them which makes it really lumpy at lower rpm's. I honestly thought there was something wrong with it until i began to research the issues on the Internet. For now I have removed the stock exhaust/cat/headers and fitted a full MIVV systems and boosted the f/a ratio by installing a couple of electronic gizmos inline with both O2 sensors which essentially fools the ECU into thinking there is too much oxygen being exhausted and in turn richens things up a bit, stock it's far too lean. These mods made a huge difference under 4K rpm. The bike is now rideable but I'm still not 100% happy with it. I've had some heads up that changing the gearing with a larger rear sprocket helps so going to give that a try and see how it works out. You can go down the full Termi and race ECU route but that's really expensive I believe and to get the most out of that you should really get it tuned on a Dyno which I'm not comfortable with in Thailand!
    Not all bad though, wind that twin on past 4K and its the most incredible pull from a bike I've ever experienced, endless amounts of torque even compared to a 200bhp GSXR-1000 I use to ride. Sublime handling from the Ohlins suspension coupled with a comfortable seating position make it nice to sit on for long distances, awesome braking power and lots of bells and whistles to keep you occupied.
    As its the Touring model it comes standard with heated grips. What use is that in LOS I hear you say. Well one December morning I departed CM heading for Nan. The ambient temp sensor indicated a cool 14 deg C. After about 1 hour of riding I had to stop as my hands were numb. It dawned on me that it had heated grips and foolishly I had no idea to operate them. Thankfully I had some Internet signal on my phone and managed to find out that the starter button becomes the heated grips control after ignition, very clever indeed. I jumped back on that bad boy put the heat setting to full and rode all the way to Nan with toasty warm mitts.
    All in all happy(ish) with the bike, still room for improvement. Anyways thought I should post this as there seems to be more and more MTS's being purchased in Thailand and to make aware some effort/money is required to bring these bikes up to a decent level of lower rpm riding behaviour. Just a note that its not the skyhook version I have so cant comment on that model however I would have thought it still has all the emissions/sound restrictions fitted as the previous model.
    I have taken my MTS apart quite a bit and quite familiar with the bike if anyone requires any help with modifications servicing etc- it's a nice bike to work on.

    Its em not very good offroad either so forget about that. If I had to choose again I would maybe consider the new KTM adventure or the Triumph if you want a more biased offroad machine. The MTS in my opinion is a road bike and thats it....

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  12. TonyBKK

    TonyBKK Ol'Timer

    Gorgeous bike Johnny, what the heck is that cable in the pic above?
     
  13. johnnysneds

    johnnysneds Ol'Timer

    It's the cable which operates the Exhaust Valve via a servo. I believe it's fitted so the bike can pass strict sound regulations in Europe at certain low rpm's. This is one of the contributory factors affecting the low rpm stuttering when it opens and closes. You can literally feel the bike surging on/off at under 3K neutral throttle because of it. Obviously once you replace the exhaust system there is no more flapper valve but the servo still has to operate the cable so a small spring/stop is fitted to enable it to motor back and forth to trick the ECU into thinking its still fitted. If you don't do this you annoyingly get EXVL errors show up on the dash. There are other option (electronic) to inhibit the device, however this was the easiest and cheapest way I chose.
    Actually when I received the bike I had the EXVL error constantly on the dash, after some fault finding I found the cable fitted to the wrong side of the pulley on the servo!!!!! Straight from the Ducati factory in Italy.....makes you wonder!

     
  14. nikster

    nikster Ol'Timer

    thx for the pix guys, gorgeous bike!!
     
  15. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    Johhnysneds wrote:

    "Just my 2 cents worth on the MTS. I have owned the 1200S Touring for a year now. Out the box I thought it was crap and had I test rode one before purchasing I probably wouldn't have gone for it. There's alot of emissions/sound restrictions on them which makes it really lumpy at lower rpm's. I honestly thought there was something wrong with it until i began to research the issues on the Internet. For now I have removed the stock exhaust/cat/headers and fitted a full MIVV systems and boosted the f/a ratio by installing a couple of electronic gizmos inline with both O2 sensors which essentially fools the ECU into thinking there is too much oxygen being exhausted and in turn richens things up a bit, stock it's far too lean. These mods made a huge difference under 4K rpm. The bike is now rideable but I'm still not 100% happy with it. I've had some heads up that changing the gearing with a larger rear sprocket helps so going to give that a try and see how it works out. You can go down the full Termi and race ECU route but that's really expensive I believe and to get the most out of that you should really get it tuned on a Dyno which I'm not comfortable with in Thailand!"

    What you are describing was a major issue on the earlier models. Luckily they have been dealt with for the 2013 models.

    2013 models are now equipped with The second generation Testastretta 11° DS engines- No more surging at low RPM. You can have a ride on mine (if you are in the area) if you are interested to know the difference.

    From: http://www.totalmotorcycle.com/motorcycles/2013models/2013-Ducati-Multistrada1200.htm (there are many more reviews om the improved engine for example: http://idratherberiding.com/2013/02/11/the-2013-ducati-multistrada/ )

    Introducing Testastretta 11° DS - The second generation

    For 2013, the arrival of the second generation Testastretta 11° DS engine introduces a number of important and highly effective enhancements, increasing torque to 12.7kgm (91.8lb-ft) and overall mid-range power delivery with even smoother operation. The improvements perfectly complement the new Multistrada 1200 by using a combination of new technologies proven on the 1199 Panigale’s Superquadro engine, and established technologies reintroduced to further enhance the overall package.

    The Testastretta 11° DS’s fuel injectors have now been repositioned to target spray directly onto the rear of the hot intake valve instead of the relatively cold surface of the intake port wall. The enhanced vaporisation achieved as the fuel hits the valve, fully atomises the incoming charge, eliminating the chance of compromised combustion efficiency experienced if droplets of fuel enter in liquid form.

    Having achieved the delivery of a fully vaporised inlet charge, Ducati engineers decided to reintroduce the concept of Dual Spark (DS) to the Testastretta 11°, with two spark plugs per cylinder-head providing a twin flame-front that ensures complete and efficient combustion across a shorter period of time.

    In order to achieve a smoother cycle-to-cycle engine operation, there is a necessity to increase the fuel injected during specific engine operations and to achieve this without affecting emissions, a secondary air system has been introduced similar to that designed for the high-performance 1199 Panigale engine. This optimisation of fuel-mapping without compromising emissions is achieved by completing the oxidisation of unburned hydrocarbons, which reduces HC and CO levels. The system is activated when the engine ECU recognises specific conditions in the engine’s operation via the lambda and throttle opening sensors. It then opens a valve enabling a flow of clean air from the main airbox to a reed valve situated in each cylinder head, which enables one-way flow into an air gallery exiting into the exhaust port close to the exhaust valve. Entering the hottest point of the exhaust gasses, the fresh charge of air enhances the burn environment, eliminating any unburned fuel that escapes during the exhaust cycle under certain conditions.
     
  16. johnnysneds

    johnnysneds Ol'Timer

    Great Ducati have addressed the previous shortfalls however I can't help but think the engine alterations are an attempt to overcome strict emission/sound regulations. I'm still reading about new MTS owners experiencing low rpm issues albeit not to the extent of the previous model, here for example . http://advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?p=21014018.
    I'm sure your bike will be lean and still retains the EXVL. Sorting these out I think you'll notice a difference. Then again if your happy the way it is no dramas.
    Have you tried a road/route for example CM to MHS? Very demanding on an MTS and amplifies the issues for sure. I wouldn't mind a go on a stock new model just for reference. My bike seems to struggle most on steep uphill hairpins where it feels like a bag of 6" nails has just been injected into the cylinders! I'm hoping the gearing change will sort this out.
    Good luck with your bike I'm sure you'll agree it a pretty awesome machine on the right road.
     
  17. NickyBKK

    NickyBKK Ol'Timer

    I am really ok with the power delivery at low rpm's. There is a lot of very useful info on ducati.ms (most probably you already know that website). Most seem to be happy with the improvements. Anyhow let's swap bikes for a comparison..one day.

    I haven't tried CM to MHS. I live in BKK but I am planning a trip to the north in the near future and it would be nice to meet up for a coffee if you are around.

    The power is amazing especially in combination with that riding position. I am not really planning on taking it of road, just wanted a bike that could go anywhere, anytime if needed.
     

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