Side/lower back pain, vibrating hands and veins popping out! o.O

Discussion in 'General Discussion / News / Information' started by ZCM, Sep 6, 2014.

  1. ZCM

    ZCM Active Member

    ..have a couple of questions i wish to put to experienced riders, and hopefully some solutions, if you have any.

    First of all my sides at my lower back area are throbbing after only approximately 3 hours of riding today (and 3 hours yesterday). Very achy. This has happened to me before, when i rode around 6 hours in one day. Concerns me a bit for times when i plan to ride for longer durations and more days, because would rather not be in ongoing pain. Is this down to my posture? (although i think my posture pretty ok). Is there anything you can suggest that might help to minimize this? (Kidney belt?)

    The next question is about vibrating silly as it sounds to ask this. After riding for a few hours my hands begin to feel like tuning forks! It settles down after a while but for some time my hands are numb and if i clap them together they feel like tuning forks haha. Does this happen to most of you too? Is it possibly that im gripping to hard? Which leads to the next question..veins. After riding the veins on my hands are literally POPPING out of my skin. Again, this settles down after some time, but looks pretty freaky for a while. So..maybe gripping too hard again?

    Sorry.. i realise these are really quite bizare questions. Particularly the hand / vein one, but thought worth asking as i noticed it today after riding and im curious about others experiences. Obviously the side/back question is the one that most concerns me.


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  3. Ian Bungy

    Ian Bungy Ol'Timer

    Sounds like the Joys of Growing Old! Try one of these for Your Lower Back issues: I have had one for Years now and can Ride all day No Problem! For Your Hands Buzzing did You change Your Handlebars? Remove the Bar End Weights? Looking at You Avatar picture You are riding a D-Tracker? They shouldn't Vibrate that much so if it is indeed the Bike Vibrating Check all the Engine Mounts, make sure they are Torqued up? Good Luck.
  4. Lakota

    Lakota Ol'Timer

    If your a relatively new rider then I suspect the Vibrating hands thing is down to your grip as you suspect. I used to get the same problems but over time I must have lightened up a bit or got used to it. I still grip far too tight with my Hands, probably always will. Apparently your supposed to grip the bike with your knees and be very light with your hands but that's never going to happen for me unless I really think about it at the time. A Kidney Belt should help with your lower back, maybe your just too tense and need to relax a bit ?

    What sort of bike do you have ? a lot of modern bikes have balance weights in the Handlebars to help with the vibration
  5. TonyBKK

    TonyBKK Ol'Timer

    I'm guessing from your avatar that you are riding a D-Tracker?

    As Ian and Lakota both said, the bars on that bike really do not have much vibration so probably you are holding on way too tight. Try to relax your grip and pretend your grips are eggs that you don't want to crush. For road riding you should never need to hold on tight and you should also not use your hands/arms/wrists to support your body weight. If there really is a lot of vibration in your bars that would indicate a problem with the bike. If you suspect a problem with the bike I'd suggest you ask someone familiar with your model to take it for a spin and give their feedback.

    I have a KLX which has the same shape seat as your D-Tracker and that stock seat is a torture device! I don't know anyone who can sit on that stock seat for more than a few hours without being in pain. Fortunately here in Thailand it's cheap as chips to have your seat modified/reshaped for comfort.

    You don't mention your age, but I know there are plenty of "old timers" who still ride long days on motard-style bikes without discomfort, so with some change in riding style and fine tuning of your bike I'm sure you too can put in long days without ill effect.

    Best of luck!!
  6. DavidFL

    DavidFL Administrator Staff Member

  7. Tom Forde

    Tom Forde Ol'Timer

    Hi mate, I just rode none stop from cha am to chiang mai through kanchaburi. A trip of usually 10 hours.
    This time it took over 11 because of the rain and 950km.
    how i felt when i got to cnx....f..cked!
    i usually ride my old bmw dakar over long distances, this time i took my cb500x. The bike went ok, but no room to move, the optional screen needs a vertical deflector as well.
    i also didnt do any physical training for thr ride, this is bloody esential as you get older.
    same ailments as you, sore muscles everywhere. Spent 2 days getting massages.
    on the way back I planned to ride from chiang rai to kanchanaburi then home to cha am, unfortunately i contacted food poison the night before.
    3 days later i got home, stopping every hour for a pee and crap.
    i ended up with the biggest boil on my bum.
    the answer to your problem is in the message above.
    1. You need to train and prepare yourself (relevant to age)
    2. Set up and know your bike for long distance.
    3. Gradually build up your trip milage until you are happy with sitting in the saddle for a full tank of juice. ( in my case 400km)
  8. ZCM

    ZCM Active Member

    ..just want to say thanks so much all for taking time to reply.
    I guess i should have mentioned age,fitness etc. Just didnt think to.
    I just left my 30's :)shh::?). I am approx 53kg, 5'6" and physically fit as i sprint run, weight train and do yoga (feel like im writing a dating profile here.. ^^). So would seem down to being tense when riding.
    I will take on board the suggestions about the handlebars and handling eggs etc (great analogy, thanks!) and i like the idea of the support belt.
    Im fairly new to riding a big bike, as i only recently bought the dtracker you see in the photo (the seat is converted and the bike is lowered..will look into what was suggested regarding the handlebars). Im learning about the bike ongoing.
    Im confident on it though, and confident on Thai roads (well as much as one can be), as ive been riding here for around 6 years and ridden most of northern Thailand..but on a Fino (haha..i know i know..)
    David, the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is something i do tend to suffer from time to time from typing and using the computer a lot. Its a concern, just didnt think to link it to what i am experiencing on the bike.
    I really like the look of the Back-A-Line Support Belt, thank you Ian. Looking into it.
    Again..thanks all. Appreciate the experienced advice and suggestions!
  9. Star Rider

    Star Rider Member

    When I stopped trying to curl/coil myself up to get on a sport bike or something similar and went to a cruiser many years ago, all the little "getting old" aches and pains left. Don't get me wrong. I love those other bikes and the way they look and handle, but I can't fit on them very well.
  10. feejer

    feejer Ol'Timer

    I used to get the sore hands on long Interstate treks on the FJR until I added a set of these Maybe a bit to "cushy" for a D-Tracker & depends on where/how you ride it, but no doubt they work great. No issues any longer.

    As far as back/side pain, almost surely a need for ergonomic/riding position adjustment. This is a good article and after some practice, it has helped me be more comfortable on long 10+ hour rides. Refers to sport touring, but it helps on my DR650 as well.

    I am only 5'-8", so pretty close to your height. Some bar risers or other adjustment in their angle could be needed too, just have to experiment a bit to see what works. Good luck sorting it out!
  11. monsterman

    monsterman Ol'Timer

    Grip puppies are very helpful as are comfortable gloves for hand vibs , be aware of carpal tunnel issues ,, relax your grip is very important , gel pads on seats or a sheepskin are good for long runs ,keep hydrated dont eat heavy food on the ride .
  12. ZCM

    ZCM Active Member

    Thank you for the additional advice and tips, much appreciated.
    Each time i have been on the bike (short rides around the mountain etc) i have been focusing on how i ride and keeping the 'handlebars and eggs' analogy in my mind. Focusing on using my thighs to grip more and aiming to be more relaxed in my upper body.. back, neck and hands.
    Ill consider the grip_puppies, just that i have small hands, but if it cuts the vibration down more, its worth looking into.
    Im reading the forum page "Master Yoga's riding position" now.
    THanks again!
  13. DavidFL

    DavidFL Administrator Staff Member

    How goes it - any progress?

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