Strolling around the Empordà - 1. The Coastal Paths

Discussion in 'Global Trip Reports' started by Jurgen, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. Jurgen

    Jurgen Ol'Timer

    Excerpt: Spanish Costa Brava was a change from my Asian bike ramblings. During three weeks, I strolled through a narrow territory, on a small bike, but with great fun along the gorgeous Empordà's coastal path.

    Strolling around the Empordà

    1. The Coastal Paths (Pals - Palafrugell)

    Complete story – 5 trip reports:

    1. The Coastal Paths (Pals - Palafrugell): http://www.gt-rider.com/thailand-motorcycle-forum/showthread.php/38977-Strolling-around-the-Empord%C3%A0-1-The-Coastal-Paths

    2. A Greek Legacy (L’Estartit - L’ Escala): http://www.gt-rider.com/thailand-motorcycle-forum/showthread.php/40188-Strolling-around-l%92Empord%E0-2-A-Greek-Inheritage

    3. Medieval Sites (Pals - Peratallada): http://www.gt-rider.com/thailand-motorcycle-forum/showthread.php/40527-Strolling-around-l%92Empord%E0-3-Medieval-sites-(Pals-Peratallada)

    4. From the Indigetes to Salvador Dali’s castle - to be published
    4. The Megaliths Trail (around the mountain - Les Gavarres) – to be published

    Preamble



    “SINCE WAGNER IS THE APOTHEOSIS OF ROMANTICISM, AND THE EMPORDA IS THE MOST REALISTIC VALLEY OF THE WOLD”

    Salvador Dali, extract from Homage to Wagner [12]

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    For me, the Catalunya Empordà [1][13] is one of the nicest place on earth; without any superlatives, this region gently wraps history, cultures, kitchen, and an agreeable climate in an ever-changing landscapes’ backdrop.

    From the Greeks, the Romans, the Visigoth, to the French conquests and to the modern wars, changes flew down the Iberian Peninsula through its northern gate. Tourism, the latest invasion is the most overwhelming; it promoted the Costa Brava to a world’s leading holiday destination. Years of affordable prices have fostered the real estate business with some disastrous consequence. The toll taken by this urbanization seems, however, lower than in other tourist paradises. The rough coastline has resisted the worst encroachments and the inland’s medieval towns, have even benefited from the renovation frenzy. Natural parks, covering large surfaces of forestland, marshland and seawater, are now also protecting a fair proportion of the Empordà’s biodiversity.

    During 43 years, I spent my holidays sailing, windsurfing and swimming along the Baix Empordà’s shore; a time of sun, sand and sangria, with few moments left to discover the region. In addition, and besides a more challenging cycling or walking, my ideal mean, for a thorough visit of the Costa Brava, has always been a motorcycle. In the past, I was unable to find a suitable mount in the region, when, recently, a “Big Moto” shop [2] opened, centrally located, in Torroella de Montgri. This gave me the opportunity to rent a small chopper, for a holiday ramble.

    A couple of hours would suffice to speed through the regions’ whole highway network on a large bike; but this was not my intention and I choose a small, hence affordable vehicle, for three weeks. A Suzuki Marauder 125 cc [2] was just adequate for a relaxed ‘two up’ drive along narrow byroads and the bike even behaved amazingly well on steep links and rocky trails.

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    A Suzuki Maraudeur 125, my companion for three weeks
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    Discovering the Empordà on two wheels was far more interesting and diverse that I had imagined, and I quickly abandoned the ‘itinerary concept’ in favor of a more heuristic approach. At times, I followed a bifurcation to an unpaved trail because it was inviting, switched to a main road to sense some refreshing wind, stopped for a picture when the light was enticing, walked down to an inaccessible cove or up through the narrow lanes of a feudal town, hiked amid the forest on a quest for hidden stones and, finally, rested for long hours to lunch or dine in one of the countless fishermen’s houses or medieval dwellings converted into eateries.

    I have stitched my rambling stories together in logical circuits. These itineraries, however, can usually not be completed in a single day, if enough time is reserved to take pictures, visit old towns, enjoy the region’s unique environment and taste local food products. The Baix Empordà’s roads are a dense maze of appealing trails where improvisation is part of the fun. A landlord, living on a remote mountain, assured me that all byroads to the valley eventually lead to Paris; as I easily returned to my base every day, I agree with him.

    1.Torroella de Mongri

    Torroella de Montgri (10’924 inhabitants [4]), a charming and historic medieval town, is an ideal starting block for a stroll through the Baix Empordà [1]. It is the crossroad of several itineraries and provides an enthralling visit, at a trip’s beginning or end.

    The austere Montgri massif protects the city’s north side. This limestone mountain range, a remote Pyrenees’ convulsion, draws the shape of a sleeping woman; a nipple castle pointing out of her bosom. Like a glowing lighthouse, this landmark provides an orientation point for the whole region.

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    The only way to reach the summit’s castle is through a one hour hike, on a rugged footpath. Skilled bikers could contemplate to drive their off-road motorcycle uphill; this is, nevertheless, strictly forbidden.

    The fort’s construction started in 1294; however, as it lost its strategic importance for the local king, it was never completed. At an altitude of 300 meters, the existing walls provide a unique lookout, which can already be sampled after a short trip above the city. This promising panorama is certainly worth the climb, but I kept this venture open for another year.

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    Torroella’s landmark is the church of Sant Genis, dating back to the XIIe century; originally a Roman construction, it was later rebuilt in Gothic style. The former Royal Palace, nowadays the ‘Palau Lomirador Hotel’, with a fine restaurant [3], is attached to it.

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    The medieval city features a characteristic narrow streets' maize, sided by colorful, mended or rebuilt, abodes. Many were converted, particularly around the ‘Plaça Major’, into small stores or restaurants, making Torrella an attractive shopping destination.

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    Some old buildings are noteworthy, but I particularly enjoy the small roads’ Clair-obscure ambiance, when the dimmed light reveals angular stones, illuminates pastel colored facades and plays with people like shadow puppets.

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    2.Platja de Pals and Begur

    After a short ride south, on highway C-31, a small trail leads to the actual starting point of my ‘Coastal Paths’ itinerary: Platja de Pals. During the cold war, a portion of this long sandy beach was a restricted zone, disfigured by Radio Liberty’s large antennas. This CIA controlled center broadcasted its programs toward the eastern countries; it has been completely dismantled in 2006 and the compound is now promoted to a natural protected area.

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    The first and second links, down from highway C-31 toward the beach, are unclassified small byroads. They meander under agreeable pine tree forest, which reach down to the sea shore and shade most of the inland. The seaside is a long and generous sand string, easily catering for a sizable apartment and camping tourist population.

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    Comparing pictures, taken in a thirty year time lap, do not show big changes from afar. Platja de Pals' wide open space harmoniously integrates the village dwellings, while the dense holiday residences are concentrated on its shores and encroached on the hills.

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    Ignoring local Route GIV-6502, the link back to the highway, I started a tortuous gymkhana along a narrow coastal path. My first ascension was along Platja del Racò and the hidden Illa Roja, Begur’s two first coves, then I plunged down again, toward paradisaical Sa Riera.

    For me, this bay is the queen of the calas, shaped like an oyster shell it is the only cove oriented toward the north, widely opened to the irascible and refreshing Tramontane and affording an ever changing outlook toward the Medes islands.

    From the north, the first glances to the beach are through tortuous coastal pine trees, sculpted like bonsais by furious winds. In the seventies, Sa Riera underwent a face lifting, particularly with higher buildings on its frontline. Nowadays, constructions are strictly regulated and structures located near the shore have been dismantled, or, are only temporarily authorized during the high season.

    Old pictures showing Sa Riera during 1970s:
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    Sa Riera today:
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    In black and white, even newer pictures are timeless; recent changes are well integrated in a typical marine backdrop.

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    A very old picture, however, gives away the modification’s extent.

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    Some original building's parts remain in place, and are still recognizable.

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    A restricted road (I am not sure, however, how restricted it is) climbs south, from Sa Riera to Punta de la Creu, a vantage point with a panorama over Platja de Pals, the Medes islands, the Golf of Roses and, at times of clear and dry skies, to the Pyrenees. At the cliff’s feet, lies ‘Ses Negres’, an integral marine reserve encompassing rocky precipices and mysterious hollows only reachable from the sea.

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    While driving along this bucolic coastal trail I was humming a hit from 1970: Digno Garcia’s “Sol y Mar, Verde Pinar, Costa Brava Catalana “ … followed by a comprehensive enumeration of the region’s coves. As in the song, the dark blue Mediterranean Sea still reflects the bright light of a mostly sunny sky, and, despite the urbanization’s encroachment, the green pine trees are still doing quite well.

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    The ‘Camins de Ronda’ (coastal paths) forms an historic lane running all along the Costa Brava’s rim. It was used by fishermen to access the coves, by smugglers, coastal guards and, nowadays, it is part of a long-distance European footpath network (Grande Randonnée), under the designation GR-92 [6]. Its signposts, in addition to local walkway markings, provide useful itineraries Informations. These pedestrian paths are usually not accessible to motorized vehicles, but alternative Routes are always nearby and, from time to time, it is also gratifying to hike the last stretch to a remote destination.

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    A dead end road leads to another coastal landmark, the former 'Cap Sa Sal' hotel. I have always been amazed by this sumptuous building from the 60th, eagle nestled on a cliff. Its appearance has not changed over the years, but it has now been reconverted into apartments.

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    Aiguafreda, a scenic small beach is situated a short slope downhill from the hotel. This narrow creek hosts few constructions apart from a jetty, used by scuba divers.

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    Dark boulders, ocher sand strips, greeneries encroaching down to the last rock crevice, crystalline waters and azure skies with warm afternoon shades are Empurdà's shores common attributes. Every cove, however, has its characteristics and own personality, making the up and down stroll along the coastline gripping.

    The next place, along my way, was Sa Tuna, a charming fishermen’s hamlet with restored abodes, now serving as secondary residences. When compared with my 30 years old picture, the hamlet's environment has kept it's identity, despite an inevitable development in prime location constructions.

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    For a change, after Sa Tuna, I climbed toward Begur town, losing my way in a road’s maze built to link countless new urbanizations. From hill to hill, the steep trail leads through pine forests, from one vantage point to another, uncovering the low occupancy secondary residences’ extension.

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    Some byroads also lead to dirt ends, safely commanding an U-turn.

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    The fierce Begur castle, an omnipresent medieval landmark, can be viewed under different perspectives and angles. This important strategic construction, already documented at the beginning of the first Millennium, went through several destruction, particularly during the Napoleonic wars.

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    Despite the necessary hike to reach the fortress’ outlook, it is a popular vantage point affording gorgeous sunsets, in a variety of setups and shades, when the light dims over the Gavares mountain range

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    Begur (4’086 inhabitants), with its Iberian roots, medieval buildings and church, pirate stories, and recent American adventures, is worth an extended visit. Its hillside location affords picturesque backdrops reaching from the Mediterranean silver blue to the yellow and green Empordà’s inland.

    Distinctive observation towers punctuate the cityscape; six, from the original twelve fortifications, are still standing. They were built in the 16th century when piracy plagued the coasts and Moor brigands sailed from North Africa to take locals into slavery; a dark episode still filling the people’s memories with horror stories.

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    One tower is located outside the city, in a large mansion, the Mas d’En Pinc. It was acquired in 1961 by the world famous flamenco dancer Carmen Armaly. She passed away two years later, and is still remembered by Begur’s denizens with a bronze statue erected at a vantage point.

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    In the XIXe century, as the region was hit by a crisis, many people immigrated to America, particularly to Cuba. Some were prosperous and returned to build characteristic colonial style houses. Today, these ‘Cases d’Indians’ are striking features of the inner city.

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    Begur’s Agora is the ‘Observatori Banc’ a long stone bench built along the church’s north wall and polished by generations of local and visitor's derrieres.

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    After leaving Begur and driving down the coast Route GIP-653, I stopped again in Esclanya. This tiny medieval city, surrounded by vineyards and olive tree orchards, features an interesting church, Sant Esteve d’Esclanya, build in 1280 on a preexisting temple’s site. A 14th century Roman tower, is erected next to it.

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    A mended old house, transformed into a restaurant, serves as an inviting surrounding to sample local food specialties.

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    3. More Begur coves


    A short drive back, on Route GIP-6531, leads to an intersection with Route GIP-6532 the way down to the third series of Begur's beaches. As most coves are now urbanized, the steep trail linking them is also asphalted.

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    A couple of tiny beaches are kept secret, protected by a longer and more difficult walking access; Platja Fonda is one of them. Recently upgraded stairs are just a slight help to overcome the dizzying impression of a steep trail. The hike’s reward, however, is a peaceful hideout in a pristine environment embellished with dark sand.

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    The next accessible beach, along the way, is Fornells, with its surrounding small coves. The rugged boulders, along this shoreline, have, according to the local tradition, given its name to the “Costa Brava”.

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    Aiguablava, the neighboring bay, is famous for its Parador, a state owned luxury hotel, perched on a rock. It is the last Begur's municipality cove. The final walkway leading to the beach is bordered by a couple of restaurants and, during summer times, the small creek knows an intense activity, with mooring boats dancing on its shore and scuba divers exploring its stony and clear underwater world.

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    From Aiguablava, a loving trail meanders all along the cliffs to the first Palafrugell municipality's beaches.

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    Aigua Xelida is another picturesque cove with several hikes, though pine forest and over boulders, to tiny rocky beaches.

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    The next hamlet, along the coast, is Tamariu, famous for it's tamarisk trees. Of appealing beauty, this former small fishing village is a compelling touristic site. It is, however, still a quiet neighborhood, with a relaxed maritime character; a place to unwind and enjoy some food and drinks.

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    Route GIV-6542 leads from Tamariu to another hidden creek: the stony Cala Pedrosa.
    From the hilltop, a fifteen minute hike, on a narrow forest footpath, plunges to the seashore. It is worth to leave the bike alone for a while, and to walk down to a confined beach with an amazing bouldered landscape. In the creek, the only dwelling, hidden between rocks of all sizes, is a small restaurant offering a short selection of excellent food.

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    As route GIV-6542 climbs toward Palafrugell city, a branchout allows to stroll along the coast, through small urbanizations and toward Cap de Sant Sebastià. This steep promontory provides a panoramic vantage point and hosts some interesting constructions. The first village, just at the cliff's foot, is Llafranc, but the view easily reaches to Calella and Cap Roig, on one side, and to Tamariu on the other side.

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    San Sebatia de la Guarda always held a strategic position, which is testified by historic monuments.

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    The Sant Sebastià 19th century's lighthouse, the most powerful of Spain, is still a reference for boats at sea. Next to it, a venerable 15th century watchtower, once erected as a defense against pirates, still provides an unhindered view toward the seas offing.

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    Iberian populations, attracted by the mountains top's privileged situation, had established a village, in San Sebastian de la Guarda, in the sixth century B.C. The archeological excavation, on this site, is recent and still ongoing.

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    An hermitage, with a small chapel, the nineteenth century 'Oratori de Sant Baldiri' is located next to the Iberian site and linked to the perched hotel 'El Far de San Sebastian'. With its luminous Mediterranean backdrop, this compound provides an enticing promenade through the local history, in an exceptional, and mostly unchanged, environment.

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    A short dive downhill the rocky cliff (alternatively a drive along the road) leads to Llafranc. With its promenade, featuring fine restaurants, a chick small marina and some celebrities dwellings, this old fishing village has a slightly upmarket character. It is well connected to Palafrugell, through Route GIV 6546 and is also linked, along the sea shore, to Callela, the next cove.

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    4. The last Palafrugell beaches.

    Despite their apparent similitude, with seaside eateries, mended fishermen's houses, summering dwellings, rocky cliffs and sandy beaches, all Empordà's coves have their own characteristics and ambiance. Discovering their distinctive atmospheres, or savoring their subtle nuances, while rambling along the Costa Brava, is gratifying. Such a stroll, following steep and winding itineraries, under odorous pine trees, on paved or rocky trails, through cramped hamlets, sometimes on narrow lanes, often without convenient parking spaces, is enjoyable on two wheels. If even feasible, it would be a burden in a closed vehicle, a dizzying experience, chilled by the air conditioner and with few opportunities to stop for a picture or to enjoy the panorama.

    Abandoning Llafranc's coastline for a while, I took Palafrugell's direction, on Route GIV-6544, before driving south again, toward Cap Roig. This cliff offers another spectacular vantage point. It also features an exquisite botanic garden and hosts the Summer Cap Roig Festival [6]. Despite being limited in size – it accommodates only 2200 spectators – it is one of Spain's major musical events, with, in 2013, performers like Elton John, Mark Knopfler, Diana Krall upon other celebrities.

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    A few of the region's most pleasing creeks are located at the Cap Roig's feet. Some hiking, along a well built catwalk, is necessary to reach remote beaches like El Golfet or Sant Roc. The promenade, however, is well rewarded by a gorgeous landscape.

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    Calella de Palafrugell, the last of the three beaches of this municipal area, is reached by a short drive down the Cap Roig hill. It is an important and picturesque town, built by fishermen, in the seventeenth century, once the coast was safe from sea bandits. Well connected to Palafrugell, the sizable dwelling is regularly patronized by locals and tourists.

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    Port Bo is an exceptionally picturesque Calella's neighborhood, located at the beaches' northern extremity. Radiant white houses, fishermen laboring around their traditional boats and gears, sunbathing vacationists, boulders and sandy shores, combined with an ever luminous backdrop, are genuine postcards setups. The small harbor’s most characteristic features, however, are its arcades, Les Voltes, a covered passage offering a fresh shelter to relax and admire the maritime landscape.

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    Leaving behind me the recreational beaches, I took route GIV-6546 toward Palafrugell (21,412 inhabitants), a Middle Age city, once established by seashore dwellers to avert the pirates assaulted coast. Over the years, the Roman city developed as an agricultural and industrial center and, now-a-days, provides a logistic backup for the region's touristic beaches.

    San Martin, a Gothic and baroque parish church mark the city's center, a narrow street's maze, mostly traffic free and sided by numerous shops and eateries.

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    Another Palafrugell's landmark is the historic Can Mario Tower, where a series of metal steps lead to a terrace with a panoramic view over the town, passing green agricultural fields, toward the Mediterranean sea, and along the Empordà's mountain ranges.

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    The region's hinterland, particularly the Gavarres mountains, is rich in cork oak trees. During the 18th and 19th century, this raw materials' profusion was the basis of a flourishing industry. These activities are now drastically reduced and the main local factory was recently transformed into an interesting cork museum (Museu del Suro).

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    In addition to permanent displays, related to the cork industry, some spaces, inside the compound, are reserved for various temporary exhibitions.

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    The Palafrugell's municipality is actively supporting cultural manifestations, particularly
    traditional music and dances venues to animate 'Plaça Nova', the main square.

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    The Empordà has its laudator: Josep Pla, a talented poet, novelist and 20th century chronicler. His diary, 'El Cuaderno Gris' (the Gray Notebook), written in 1918-19, is his best known piece of work; a small slice of his 30'000 pages prose, collected in forty-six volumes.

    Josef Pla was born in Palafrugell and, beside intensive travelling around Europe, spent most of his life in the region. His native house now hosts a foundation and his museum. He is also honored through a monument with various elements reminding his writing and his life.

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    Casually, as I was hunting for Josep Pla's writings in a small store, I met Joan Aliu [10] an affable and knowledgeable bookseller. He is the author of a graphic novel retracing some aspects of Josep Pla's life. I was lucky to get his book autographed and savored its reading … even so it is written in Català.

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    4. First part's epilogue

    June and July are blessed months for motorcycling in Empordà. The weather is not yet too hot and the sky, while often dotted by refreshing cumulus, provides only infrequent showers; actually, I had no one, during the day, all along my three weeks biking.

    Short lived heavy rains, even hailstorms, are, however, part of the season's meteorological mood, as are the chilling Tramontane wind rushes, down the Gulf of Lion; these natural phenomena add a dramatic variety to picturesque land or marine backdrops.

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    In the dry season, negligence or ill-will often starts catastrophic forest fires and the Empordà's pine trees landscape is particularly exposed to such blazes. In 2012 the whole region was blanketed under heavy reddish clouds from a large fire in the Pyrenees region [11]

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    No … there is no mistake in the name ‘Begur’, this panel just signals the city limit. The former ‘Bagur’, however, is now out-of-date [13].

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    Until the mid Seventies, during general Franco’s times, Catalunya was a centrally controlled province were independence symbols, like the Catalan flag and the Catalan language were outlawed. The 1978th constitution and the autonomous ‘Generalitat de Cartalunya's’ installation brought rapid changes, and, for tourists, the necessity to update their dictionaries, maps and small talk vocabulary stock. The Catalan language became rapidly ubiquitous, for village names, on street signboards, in shops and on restaurant menus.

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    Unruly inscriptions take the risk to be “corrected” by rough graffiti.

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    The 'Four Lines of Blood', the Catalan banner's red stripes, are now visible everywhere. In the year 2012, the 'Estelada', a pro-independence flag, became more popular, particularly in support of a 2014 self-determination referendum, following the Scotland's model.

    The poll's principle is opposed by the Spanish Government, arguing that it is unconstitutional. This has not hindered people to show their support for the referendum, notably, on 11 September 2013, with an imposing 400 km, human chain, linking the French border to Valencia [8]

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    This is not yet my rambling story's dead end! Three more itineraries, on the same bike and still around the Baix Empordà, are on my drawing board.

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    Notes

    [1] Girona, Catalunya’s northern province, is divided into regions (comarcas); The Empordà – Baix Empordà (Low Empordà or Empordanet) and Alt Empordà (High Empordà) are two neighboring administrative regions, inside the province of Girona.

    The Empordà's sea shores cover most of the famous Costa Brava, Girona province's rocky Mediterranean rim.

    My strolling on a small motorbike was mostly inside the Baix Empordà, an area of only 700 sq km. Actually, I did not even reach the regions south point (St-Feliu) but extended my strolling slightly inside the Alt Empordà, to La Escala and Emporion
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampurdán
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalonia

    [2] Big Moto, www.bigmoto.es
    Prices 2013: Honda Maraudeur 125, daily 32 Euro, weekly 228 Euro. Other bikes available, scooters (50 and 125) BMW 650 and 1200

    [3] www.hotelpalaumirador.com

    [4] 2010 demographics references from : “L’Empordà to take away” (Publicaciones y Communicación, Girona, June 2011)

    [5] Ref: Camins de ronda – La traversée de La Costa Brava ( Sergi Lara, Triangle Postals, S.L. , 2010)
    and websites :
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GR_footpath
    http://www.spain.info/en/que-quieres/deportes/deportes-activos/senderos/girona/gr_92_sendero_mediterraneo.html
    http://wikitravel.org/en/GR_92 (unfinished)
    http://ca.wikipedia.org/wiki/GR_92 (Spanish, unfinished)
    trail map : http://www.ikimap.com/map/gr-92-catalunya-sender-de-gran-recorregut

    [6] http://www.caproigfestival.com/
    [7] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estelada
    [8] http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24052713
    [9] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalan_language
    [10] Joan Aliu is the owner of a bookshop in Palafrugell (Calle Tarongeta, 24) , he has written several historical graphic novels (Notes de Josep Pla en còmic, Història de Palafrugell en còmic , …) . I also enjoyed his short (online) “ 3 different stories for the sweet sausage” http://issuu.com/canjuando/docs/botifarra_dolca_can_juando/1
    [11] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt_Empordà_fires_of_2012
    http://www.euronews.com/2012/07/23/four-killed-in-catalonia-fires-near-spain-france-border/
    [12] Extract from geological foundations of the Venusberg. Text by Salvador Dali, written for the program of Bacchanale (November 9, 1939)

    [13] Local names traduction:
    Empurdà's official language is now català, and I have chosen to mostly stick to the local names' spellings, in my text, even so I am writing in English. The differences, however, are usually small and should not disorient readers aware of the existing language differences.
    Catalunya, for instance, is written Catalonia in English and Cataluña in Spanish.
    Empordà is Empurdan in English and Ampurdán in Spanish
    Baix Empordà is Low Empurdan in English and Bajo Ampurdán in Spanish

    Other accessed websites:
    http://www.begur.cat/web/cat/index.php
    http://www.begur.cat/turisme/eng/historia.php
    http://www.beguronline.com/history.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catalan_independence
    http://www.palafrugell.cat/portal/
     
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  3. brian_bkk

    brian_bkk Ol'Timer Staff Member

    Brillant Jurgen.. Another winner..
     
  4. Changnoi1

    Changnoi1 Ol'Timer

    Wow .... thanks for a trip into memory-lane .... I did spend a part of my life there in the 70' and 80's. And still so beautiful!
    The fact that Sa Rierra was and still is a beauty is thanks to the 2 family's that practically own Sa Rierre. And of course that it was (and maybe still is) a favourite beach resort of some of the Royal Spanish family.

    Here some old photos https://plus.google.com/photos/109048257072638509517/albums/5511117919307108769?banner=pwa
     
  5. Jurgen

    Jurgen Ol'Timer

    Thank you Changnoi for the vintage Sa Riera pictures, I enjoyed them and was looking if I could spot my car :); I am there (in the Summer) since 1966. Maybe we have met sometimes LOL. I have used many transportation means in the region, mostly on the water or driving a car. This was my first exploration on two wheels, and I greatly enjoyed the ramble. I still have more pictures and writings about the Baix Empurdà on my drawing board ... but my keyboard is on slow motion.
     
  6. Enric Cabruja

    Enric Cabruja New Member

    Molt bon reportatge de la meva terra Jürgen!!!! :happy3:

    La Costa Brava és molt gran però la part que descrius tu és la que més m'agrada doncs és on vaig passar tots els estius de la meva infantesa.

    Moltes gràcies per fer un reposrtatge tant extens i ben fet!!!.
     
  7. DavidFL

    DavidFL Administrator Staff Member

    A breath taking report Jurgen. It's easy to see what that it one of the top holiday destinations in Europe.
     

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