Africa Twin Crf1000l Review – A User’s Gripe

DavidFL

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Jan 16, 2003
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After a few KM of climbs and descents, I quickly realised the Africa Twin requires a lot of throttle and prefers to be powered up rather than guided. Not a bad thing. And who doesn’t like the feeling of powering up a dusty trail? But there’s a flaw in this method – the suspension, which was a little hard after setting up to counter the wobble on the road. Once again, I faffed around with the front-end.

Making my way up was done so with some trepidation. The need for constant high throttle from 1st to 2nd on the climbs left me feeling a little out of control over the bike. Not enough in 1st, the bike stuttered in 2nd on some steep sections. Dropping back down into 1st to prevent stalling and dropping the bike was needed.

As I mentioned previously, I adjusted the suspension to suit the conditions, and powering up was met with humps, divots and ruts that didn’t match the capability of the suspension or lack of. The increased force caused by speed and terrain forced the front to near enough max out. Other factors also need to be taken into consideration. Standing on the pegs with your body over the bars going uphill increase the physical difficulties and load of the front. In this configuration, the rear isn’t taking the brunt of the action.

I got through it and made my way to the top safely. When I told the dealer prior where I intended to ride the bike, he was a little surprised. And many I have spoken to thought the bike was too heavy to do those climbs. But having made it so many times on my Versys with ease and confidence, I thought the Africa Twin would have been a doddle. It was the opposite!

After taking in the scenery on the mountaintop, I made the return journey back down which is trickier than the climb as it requires slower, more balanced speeds, sometimes riding over tracks a few inches wide with 1 – 2ft drops either side carved by heavy rains and 4x4 requires some skill on steep sections. Also, tires in this scenario or of utmost importance. If the tires let go, the ABS kicks in and this steed doesn't let you switch the front off.

I made the first couple of steep descents before reaching a point where one can continue on your original course, or take a left-hander which has a smoother descent. I bottled it and took the smoother course, something I wouldn’t have even considered on my modified Versys due to modifying the ABS.

That being said, one can’t fault the CRF1000l on the road. Its upright riding position provides long-term comfort with its adjustable seat. Handling is great and power is ample enough for these roads. An adjustable screen would have been nice to counter the buffeting. Torque control is fine, but far too aggressive with adventure tires.



Spicing up the relationship between rider and machine!
View attachment 116841
To get the best out of the Africa Twin requires some confidence and understanding of the bike’s physics. It’s like an overexcited border-collie dog, requiring long brisk runs. It’s certainly no couch-potato but requires a healthy right-wrist to make this machine thrust! Powering through dirt, climbs, rough or smooth is begging to be done with throttle. And when you give it some, this thing eats most terrain up with ease, but certainly not in standard form!
View attachment 116842

View attachment 116843
The Africa Twin CRF1000l out of the box is set up for riders in the 75kg mark. Regardless, the suspension isn’t adequate for speedy off road. The front, while adequate for the tarmac, is dated technology. The rear shock is good, but not great. The foot pegs would barely suite a 3rd grader’s sized feet - narrow and uncomfortable. The right-side peg is cast-made and many have reported broken brackets. The handguards are as useful as a chocolate fireguard offering nothing more than wind protection. The rear brake reservoir is placed in a precarious position. And worst of all, the fender is bordering on dangerous for off road use. A biker friend and I have succumbed to front wheel lockup due to the fender gap between the tire and collected mud. It’s a common issue. And the torque control is fine, but far too aggressive with adventure tires.
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None of the above matters to the street orientated rider that may venture on a dusty trail run while admiring passing flowers. But riders looking for real adventure need to make changes to the Africa Twin CRF1000l from tires to suspension, and a budget between 150k to 200k is required, and something to bare in mind before purchasing this bike based on clever marketing. And the differences in opinions are very apparent between those who actually give it some off road, and those who’d prefer not to get dirty.

Honda have marketed this bike for off road adventure, but for the love of god, why didn’t Honda address the simplest of issues such as the fender, pegs, mount and gaurds that would have added nothing to the budget! Suspension and tires are a personal thing as one manufacturer-make doesn’t suit all. But it seems Honda have penny pinched with the most ridiculous of items that would have otherwise made a near enough perfect machine.


Just wondering now - would you ever buy another one, or is this one good enough.
The new 2020 model has so much more

2020 Africa Twin improvements

1. The water-cooled, overhead-cam, parallel-twin engine receives an 86cc displacement increase, growing from 998cc to 1084cc. Honda says it has improved intake and exhaust systems, resulting in a horsepower boost of approximately six percent. The new bike makes 101 horsepower, up seven horsepower over the previous generation. It also puts out 77 ft/lbs of torque.

2. The 2020 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin’s frame is updated for optimized for handling. The rear subframe is now aluminum and detachable, plus the CRF450R-style aluminum swingarm is lighter and more rigid.

3. Due to the use of a six-axis IMU, the new CRF1100L Africa Twin has more advanced electronic aids. Functions include wheelie control, cornering ABS, rear-lift control, DCT cornering detection, and cornering lights.

4. The new Adventure Sports ES model now features electronic ride-height suspension. The Adventure Sports ES model is also updated with tubeless wheels, heated grips, accessory socket, larger skid plate, aluminum rear rack, and a larger 6.5-gallon tank over the base model’s five-gallon tank.

5. Although power has increased, the ADV motorcycle weighs less than the outgoing 2019 model. The base CRF1100L weighs 498 pounds, and the DCT model tips the scales at 520 pounds. The weight savings are due to a lighter engine and transmission.

6. The seat also got lower—from 34.3 to 33.4 inches. A low seat is available at 32.5 inches, and a taller one up to 35.2 inches.

7. The standard CRF1100L has a renewed focus on off-road use, with a shorter, fixed windscreen and a 5.0-gallon fuel tank.

8. There are now four versions of the Africa Twin: the base CRF1100L in both standard and DCT; and the CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES in both standard and DCT.

9. The 2020 versions have a new 6.5-inch TFT color touchscreen display that is compatible with Apple CarPlay. The touchscreen display is optimized for ease of use when changing the electronic adjustments.

10. Cruise control is now standard on all Africa Twin versions.

11. Wheel sizes are still dirt-oriented. The 2020 Africa Twin has a 21-inch front and 18-inch rear, both wire-spoked wheels. The Adventure Sports ES uses tubeless tires.

12. Except for the addition of cornering ABS, the braking system remains unchanged. The 2020 CRF1100L arrives with dual 310mm front discs squeezed by four-piston Nissin calipers, and a single 256mm disc out back squeezed by a single-piston caliper.

13. For 2020, two color options are available: Pearl Glare White/Blue, and Matte Metallic Black.

Source: 2020 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin: 11 Fast Facts (Larger & Lighter)
 

Oddvar

Ol'Timer
Mar 18, 2013
435
250
63
With the crises going on there will be many AT for sale when this is over.
If you are a dirt biker, 250's, you will appreciate the standard version as you can stand over the tank with your knees locked to the tank. Thanks to the "outside" air box. (A pain in the arse to actually get to the air filters.)
If you are of the new breed,"Adventure rider", the adventure sport version is probably the right bike.
DCT or manual is a personal choice.
If I for some reason had to choose just one bike for my garage, it would be AT standard DCT.
BMW says that less than 1% of the GS sold are never on dirt, wonder what those number would be on other "Adventure bikes".:p:p
 

Oddvar

Ol'Timer
Mar 18, 2013
435
250
63
Time to check the actual milage in one tank.
20200425_142142.jpg

Loaded with one Rotopax tank I set off along the Boklua road. Right after the Santisuk intersection the bike started to "cough" in the uphills. But once up on the flats the bike was flying. In the hill leading up to the switch backs it started to give a clear message!
As this was a hot day I chose to stop in the shade. Bike still idling.

20200425_191433.jpg

388.2km. Various roads and engine settings. I am happy with that. 20.98 km/litre.
A similar test with the CRF250L and the Acerbis tank gave me 386km. 32.16 km/litre.
My Valkyrie F6 has been up to 8.4 km/litre. ;)
 

Ian Bungy

Ol'Timer
Sep 19, 2006
2,285
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83
www.chiangmai-xcentre.com
Time to check the actual milage in one tank.
View attachment 135677
Loaded with one Rotopax tank I set off along the Boklua road. Right after the Santisuk intersection the bike started to "cough" in the uphills. But once up on the flats the bike was flying. In the hill leading up to the switch backs it started to give a clear message!
As this was a hot day I chose to stop in the shade. Bike still idling.

View attachment 135678
388.2km. Various roads and engine settings. I am happy with that. 20.98 km/litre.
A similar test with the CRF250L and the Acerbis tank gave me 386km. 32.16 km/litre.
My Valkyrie F6 has been up to 8.4 km/litre. ;)
OK I just back read this post so Congratulations Oddvar! Catch up soon for a Look!
 

DavidFL

Administrator
Staff member
Jan 16, 2003
12,239
2,523
113
67
Chiang Khong
www.thegtrider.com
Time to check the actual milage in one tank.
View attachment 135677
Loaded with one Rotopax tank I set off along the Boklua road. Right after the Santisuk intersection the bike started to "cough" in the uphills. But once up on the flats the bike was flying. In the hill leading up to the switch backs it started to give a clear message!
As this was a hot day I chose to stop in the shade. Bike still idling.

View attachment 135678
388.2km. Various roads and engine settings. I am happy with that. 20.98 km/litre.
A similar test with the CRF250L and the Acerbis tank gave me 386km. 32.16 km/litre.
My Valkyrie F6 has been up to 8.4 km/litre. ;)

Impressed you were able to afford running the Valkyrie for so long.
 

Dodraugen

Ol'Timer
Aug 19, 2012
264
180
43
53
Lampang
Time to check the actual milage in one tank.
View attachment 135677
Loaded with one Rotopax tank I set off along the Boklua road. Right after the Santisuk intersection the bike started to "cough" in the uphills. But once up on the flats the bike was flying. In the hill leading up to the switch backs it started to give a clear message!
As this was a hot day I chose to stop in the shade. Bike still idling.

View attachment 135678
388.2km. Various roads and engine settings. I am happy with that. 20.98 km/litre.
A similar test with the CRF250L and the Acerbis tank gave me 386km. 32.16 km/litre.
My Valkyrie F6 has been up to 8.4 km/litre. ;)

Time to ride the Valk then when the gas price is down to 18-19 baht a litre...

Joke aside - do you use 91or 95 gasohol on your bikes?
On my Crf250 I get ~ 33 kilometers to the litre using 91 gasohol. Using 95 gasohol I get ~ 35 kms to the litre. And when the gas price is only 27 satang pr litre I have used 95 gasohol the last couple of years.

The Valk I presume you use 100 % benzine?
 

Oddvar

Ol'Timer
Mar 18, 2013
435
250
63
About 10 years or so ago, the yellow benzine was 53 bath pr litre. And I manage to fill up for 1060 bath. 3-4 fillings a day made it an expensive bike to use. For other bikes I use 95.

Knowing from a test can make a big difference.
One time in China we were all short of fuel. I stopped next to a guy on a GS. He was not empty but his "meter" said 0 km. So as a good German, he stopped. I encouraged him to continue and I would ride behind him. After 18km we stopped at a gas station and he filled 2-3 dl short of full tank while mumbling "It should not be possible because the "meter" said 0 km'.:joy::joy::joy:
 

Oddvar

Ol'Timer
Mar 18, 2013
435
250
63
Anyone with experience with steering dampers?
Is it worth getting one for the AT?

136081-2f41464b0065de9c328e1c5014a7a11c.png
 

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Cruzer

Member
Aug 23, 2019
22
4
3
Just wondering now - would you ever buy another one, or is this one good enough.
The new 2020 model has so much more

2020 Africa Twin improvements

1. The water-cooled, overhead-cam, parallel-twin engine receives an 86cc displacement increase, growing from 998cc to 1084cc. Honda says it has improved intake and exhaust systems, resulting in a horsepower boost of approximately six percent. The new bike makes 101 horsepower, up seven horsepower over the previous generation. It also puts out 77 ft/lbs of torque.

2. The 2020 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin’s frame is updated for optimized for handling. The rear subframe is now aluminum and detachable, plus the CRF450R-style aluminum swingarm is lighter and more rigid.

3. Due to the use of a six-axis IMU, the new CRF1100L Africa Twin has more advanced electronic aids. Functions include wheelie control, cornering ABS, rear-lift control, DCT cornering detection, and cornering lights.

4. The new Adventure Sports ES model now features electronic ride-height suspension. The Adventure Sports ES model is also updated with tubeless wheels, heated grips, accessory socket, larger skid plate, aluminum rear rack, and a larger 6.5-gallon tank over the base model’s five-gallon tank.

5. Although power has increased, the ADV motorcycle weighs less than the outgoing 2019 model. The base CRF1100L weighs 498 pounds, and the DCT model tips the scales at 520 pounds. The weight savings are due to a lighter engine and transmission.

6. The seat also got lower—from 34.3 to 33.4 inches. A low seat is available at 32.5 inches, and a taller one up to 35.2 inches.

7. The standard CRF1100L has a renewed focus on off-road use, with a shorter, fixed windscreen and a 5.0-gallon fuel tank.

8. There are now four versions of the Africa Twin: the base CRF1100L in both standard and DCT; and the CRF1100L Adventure Sports ES in both standard and DCT.

9. The 2020 versions have a new 6.5-inch TFT color touchscreen display that is compatible with Apple CarPlay. The touchscreen display is optimized for ease of use when changing the electronic adjustments.

10. Cruise control is now standard on all Africa Twin versions.

11. Wheel sizes are still dirt-oriented. The 2020 Africa Twin has a 21-inch front and 18-inch rear, both wire-spoked wheels. The Adventure Sports ES uses tubeless tires.

12. Except for the addition of cornering ABS, the braking system remains unchanged. The 2020 CRF1100L arrives with dual 310mm front discs squeezed by four-piston Nissin calipers, and a single 256mm disc out back squeezed by a single-piston caliper.

13. For 2020, two color options are available: Pearl Glare White/Blue, and Matte Metallic Black.

Source: 2020 Honda CRF1100L Africa Twin: 11 Fast Facts (Larger & Lighter)

4 Days with the CRF1100L DCT ES
Just want to share my experience on the fully decked out Africa Twin 1100 Adventure Sports DCT with Electronic Suspension. Rented this for 4 days riding from Chiang Mai to Nan and around Bo Kluea. I own a CB500x with upgraded suspension, and ridden a bunch of Versys 650s and V-Strom 650s on similarly long trips so those will be my main point of references.

Highways
From my experience, the bike's biggest strength overall is its ability to cruise on long trips. Everything from the comfortable seating position, larger fairings, larger windscreen, larger fuel tank, the DCT, and especially the engine, made it perfect for this. Passing other cars even on inclines was never an issue, and on the highway, it didn't shy away from reaching 200km/h on the two occasions I tried- more power than any of us will ever need. The electronics package comes into its own on long travels, being able to flip between power modes, suspension settings, traction control, engine braking and abs on the fly. Of particular use to me was changing from softer dampening for highways to a tighter setting on the twisties. Absolutely great and completely unnecessary, but great nonetheless. I would hate to think how much it would cost if a part fails though!

Twisty Roads
A friend of mine rented a cb500x so we got to switch bikes during the trip. While he had the newer 2019 version with a 19 inch front wheel (as opposed to the 17 on earlier models), hopping off an africa twin and back to a cb500x made the smaller bike feel... small... and nimble. The smaller bike was just more maneuverable (even with it's 19 inch front wheel), and more importantly, more alive than the Africa Twin on smaller roads. The line 'it's better to ride a slow bike fast than to ride a fast bike slow' comes to mind. The AT wasn't a slouch on twisties, but you could feel the size of the wheel, the longer wheelbase, and the weight of the bike more. It also lacked the direct feel of a lower tech (smaller?) bike. The cb500x with its gentle engine felt ALIVE on small roads and there's no two ways about it compared to the top spec Africa Twin. Maybe it was the 21 inch front, maybe it was the extra weight, maybe it was the bigger body, or the DCT... or maybe all of that combined. But it provided a different experience that was more like driving an S Class Benz than a little Mazda Miata. I wouldn't say there's anything wrong with either experience, but buyer beware! Expectations need to be managed.

Off Road
Ok, so no khao krajom trails but I did a little bit of gravel around Nan and maybe because it wasn't my bike, or maybe it was the size, or maybe the DCT- but i didn't feel 100% confident riding it off road. I don't think it was because the bike couldn't do it, but maybe because I wasn't a good enough rider to get the most out of it- or that it costs 700,000 baht and I didn't want the extra expense if I dropped it!

Favorites
This being my first bike with electronic suspension, I didn't know what to expect. But after 4 days and 1,300km, I've come away impressed. It is definitely something I wished every bike had. I'm quite particular with suspension on my cb500x, and adjust whenever I add or remove weight down to the last click. The electronic settings are much, much more general, but provide a 'good enough' setting, and with more time you can customize it even more to your liking. Two button presses I'm in a soft suspension mode, and two button presses back to a tighter setting. Brilliant!! I do everything with my bike from commuting to weekend trips to long trips, by myself, with my gf, and packed to the brim and having this feature would be great!

The second best attribute is the engine. It's more power than you'll ever need on Thai roads and runs under stressed pretty much all the time. Cruising at 150kmh is effortless, and to be honest, running at 200 felt more like 140kph on smaller bikes- solid, slightly noisy but stable nonetheless. The engine seems solid through and through and will probably have a long life.

Gripes
I'm not sure if this is just for the Adventure Sports model but the radiator fans blow directly into my knees. I'm about 5 foot 10 with a 33 inch inseam which I think is a pretty standard height so it's curious that it was designed that way. My friend who is around 5 foot 9 with a 31 inch inseam didn't have this issue though- go figure!

Despite a large windscreen- I couldn't find a good setting that suited me- on the lowest setting wind hit the top of my helmet, and the higher setting was somehow worse- I think because the wind is going through the side of the windscreen instead.

Lastly, the biggest gripe with this particular model is the lack of 'feel'. The DCT is fine around town, it's also fine on the highways, but I definitely put it in manual mode for the twisties after I realized this bike can't read my mind. I love cornering while keeping the bike revs in the midrange for more response and engine braking, but the DCT didn't do that naturally (even in Sport 3 mode). No problem, I use the finger shifters and drop down to the gear I prefer which is fine- but it's a different experience to a clutch and manual transmission. With a powerful engine where gears mattered less, I would sometimes forget to shift (I could hardly hear or feel the engine through the bars or otherwise- curious!), whereas bikes like the CB will let you know when to shift (engine noise, handlebar vibrations, general feeling).

For all the things this bike does well, it does not provide you with that direct mechanical experience. As a tourer, this matters less, but for me it's a deal breaker. As I said before, running at stupid speeds this bike makes you feel like you're on the living room couch- fine for a lot of things, but I don't want to run my bike that fast to get a bit of excitement! I do wonder if changing to a manual transmission would change this experience entirely, but for now I can't comment on that!

Overall
The 2020 AT Adventure Sports DCT ES is a great tourer with the latest gadgetry. But be warned that it is less of an off road machine and more of a luxury car, providing you speed and stability in a relatively quiet cockpit. If you enjoy the practicality of technology and don't mind the loss of 'feel' in the riding experience, this is a great bike. For those that care about riding feel, this is perhaps a good reason to keep 700,000 baht in your pocket!

Personally even if someone gave me this bike for free, I couldn't ride it practically around Bkk as my commute is 30km either way in traffic. It's more to do with the size of the bike (getting between cars) and the engine heat more than anything else. In no part of my trip did I feel the bike's weight at low speed- i could crawl the bike while balancing easily even on a full tank but maybe this changes in the heat, in traffic, on a monday morning, in bangkok. In any case, it's the size, engine heat and loss of feel that doesn't make it a viable option for what I need. Perhaps a T7 is better suited? Anyone here have any experiences with that bike? Also, if I ever get to try the standard CRF1100L with manual transmission I will post an update as I suspect it is different from the top spec model!
 

Cruzer

Member
Aug 23, 2019
22
4
3
Only plan for the front end. Cheaper than OEM.
OEM fairing alone 30k plus. Headlight a dare to think. During my crash the speedo was damaged. Honda wanted 32k for a new one. 11k from Canada. Managed to have mine repaired to maintain original mileage.
This is an old post but hope you and your bike have recovered from your injuries!! Just wondering if you had any long term updates with your africa twin? It seems to me that the older models had issues with foot pegs being weak, and the front fork have a stiction problems but wonder if you've experienced any of that? Would love to know, my friend is considering a used Africa Twin!
 

Oddvar

Ol'Timer
Mar 18, 2013
435
250
63
I bought a second hand 2017 DCT. Never regretted that.
I did not buy it to replace my dirt bikes;)
The DCT is awesome once I let go of my conservative attitude.
Once you know all knobs and buttons without looking, it is no going back.
And on dirt it's big fun. The 16-17 mods have a narrow tank and suits dirt bikers better.
 

Cruzer

Member
Aug 23, 2019
22
4
3
I bought a second hand 2017 DCT. Never regretted that.
I did not buy it to replace my dirt bikes;)
The DCT is awesome once I let go of my conservative attitude.
Once you know all knobs and buttons without looking, it is no going back.
And on dirt it's big fun. The 16-17 mods have a narrow tank and suits dirt bikers better.
Yeah I agree it seems like one of those things that will take time to get used to if you're set in your ways with the clutch haha! I'll tell you something though, coming out of a traffic light the DCT shifts like a demon from hell in sport mode! I could never launch a bike that quickly if I tried on a manual transmission!
 

Heineken

Ol'Timer
Mar 2, 2019
129
175
43
Great review Cruzer, all bikes are a compromise ;)


Are you familiar with the DCT or was this the first time ?...............................I have a DCT NC750X and the sports mode 3 is awesome in the mountains, sure I override down a gear sometimes with the toggle switch, but most of the time the bike gets it perfectly, I rarely, if ever use manual mode
 

Cruzer

Member
Aug 23, 2019
22
4
3
Hi
Great review Cruzer, all bikes are a compromise ;)


Are you familiar with the DCT or was this the first time ?...............................I have a DCT NC750X and the sports mode 3 is awesome in the mountains, sure I override down a gear sometimes with the toggle switch, but most of the time the bike gets it perfectly, I rarely, if ever use manual mode


Hi Heineken!

Thanks and yes this is 100% my first time so I can't say I am a good reference for using DCT haha! I can see its uses and I think if I owned the bike it would just be a matter of time to get used to it. The NC750x seems like a cool bike too and I'm actually waiting for the rumored smaller africa twin that's supposed to be based on that platform!
 

jayjay

New Member
Oct 15, 2020
4
6
3
Just turned 10000km on my CRF1100L4 Africa Twin.

From the prospective of the CRF1100L4 Africa Twin ES DCT it’s a solid bike, thinking its well-rounded compared to the other larger bikes in this class, from this I would compare the larger class bikes rather than a 500 to an 1100. Given the GSA / Triumph or any of these bikes what you are getting yourself into is a different weight / class of machine totally.

Its performance is a little down over the Ducati’s, KTm’s and the BMW but Honda have improved this by fitting a valve on the exhaust to let it open up at higher RPM let it breathe (Emissions stuff), handling 100% improvement on the older models as said shift hard to soft on the fly including rear pre-load settings on the rear when stationary, DCT with the Throttle by wire and the IMU (Inertia Movement Unit) 6 axis lets you really sit in the motorcycle from my own prospective improves my riding ability. The 21 inch front wheel is lively at higher road speed keeping the pre-load up with a little more weight pushing on the front seems to sort that out. The corner lights are something with 3 x stage more you lean the more lights come on to illuminate the darker places on the planet. Build quality having just fitted a power hub and removing fuel tank to do the wiring the Japanese really can put a very very nice machine together.

Where I think the 2020 AT really shines is in itself just looks great works well and who is looking to get themselves into Honda Japanese technology with the DCT and knowing the obvious already (Weight / Power / Technology (DCT) will love it.
Africa Twin 2020.jpg
 

canthai

Ol'Timer
Apr 8, 2015
294
95
28
Great review Cruzer, all bikes are a compromise ;)


Are you familiar with the DCT or was this the first time ?...............................I have a DCT NC750X and the sports mode 3 is awesome in the mountains, sure I override down a gear sometimes with the toggle switch, but most of the time the bike gets it perfectly, I rarely, if ever use manual mode
Did you have the 700 before the 750 ?
If so, how do they compare. Found a nice looking 700 DCT for sale at a good price
 

Lakota

Ol'Timer
Oct 10, 2011
167
12
18
I've got the same Model JayJay. I've only done 1600kms and the DCT took some getting used to. I now think the DCT is marvelous. A lot of people review this bike over a couple of days not having ridden a DCT before and they just don't understand it and therefore give it the thumbs down. I get lots of guys asking if it's got engine breaking as they consider it an automatic. It's got tons of engine breaking if you manually knock it down a gear or 2. So much so that you hardly need to use the brakes. I still ride my Vstrom 650 daily for commuting and as a workhorse. The Vstrom is a nice bike and i've put Ohlins suspension on it but the longer travel electronic suspension on the AT is a class above.

I'm lovin this Bike but it is Huge and I think 'top heavy' when stationary . You really have to think about where and how you park it. The Vstrom feels small in comparison and my CB500X feels tiny now. I wouldn't want to ride the CB500X any distance now but Its still great for a few hours in the local mountains ........

If I could only have one bike it wouldn't be the one
 

Heineken

Ol'Timer
Mar 2, 2019
129
175
43
Did you have the 700 before the 750 ?
If so, how do they compare. Found a nice looking 700 DCT for sale at a good price


I have never owned a NC700X, but have rented them many times in Chiang Mai back when they first came on the market, for longer trips only, not just for one or two days, in 2012/2013 ?.............I liked them back then and the NC750X is better all-round, more power, 3 x sports modes instead of the 700 with one..............like most reviews say it not an exciting bike, but it is a reliable all-rounder, good at everything...........I couldn't buy a bike without storage and the 22L frunk its awesome.


I suppose it depends on how cheap the 700 is compared to getting a 750, plus a new upgraded model will be released this year..............Power wise my mates Verys 650 can beat me in a race in a straight-line, not by alot, but is quicker............maybe different now as my bike is run in and seemed to improve after the 24k valve adjustment ?.....ive done 33k km now


If you do not know of Mike Gagne of Ubon Ratchathani his 2015 NC750X has just clocked over 220 000km, without any major repairs, no clutches, no engine work, no gearbox issues, just recommended Honda service which is reassuring for us NC750X owners...............Ive ridden alot with Mike, he doesnt baby the bike either, lookup Amazing Thailand Touring if you want his thoughts
 

canthai

Ol'Timer
Apr 8, 2015
294
95
28
Thanks for the info.
Will go look at the 700 - not far from where I live and the price is right