Good Evening/morning From The Uk

Discussion in 'New Members' started by Billy Mill, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. Billy Mill

    Billy Mill New Member

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    Hi Guys.

    I've been riding a big bike in the UK for the last two years, mainly year round commuting and a few local tours. I've racked up about 10,000 miles each year. It's now time to branch out a little and I'm heading to Chiang Mai at the end of this month to try foreign roads for the first time. Unfortunately, I've only got three or four days to explore the very best roads before the other half drags me to the beaches further south. If the pictures and the reviews on here are anything to go by, I'm counting this trip as research for future visits. Please don't tell the oh!

    I've had a quick scout through the rental pages and I'm sure there's a ready supply of the type of bike I'm after for a two up steady tour. My question relates to the practice of passports as deposit? I understand this is fairly widespread, I'd personally keep my passport and pay a deposit on the bike instead. Has anybody got any advice or experience in terms of best practice for this?

    Thanks for letting me on and ride safe :)
     
  2. Deano747

    Deano747 Ol'Timer

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    I can give some very general advice rom the perspective of someone who doesn't live there, but goes there for a couple of weeks every year over more than a decade.

    The passport thing isn't a problem from a large motorcycle hire firm. Think Pops, Mr mechanic, C & P Big Bike. Don't know about the size of the deposit you would have to leave in lieu if they allowed you, but I believe it would be for the price of the bike. Think > 300,000 Baht for a V Strom / Versys. When Pops was alive he eventually allowed me to keep mine, but that was after renting multiple bikes off him for a number of years so there was a history of trust.

    Be aware that there is NO accident insurance available for bike hire. You break it, you pay for it. You write it off, you have just bought them a new one.

    The way around both of the above is to do your journey with a tour group. They all do a 3 day MHS loop which is what you want to do with your 3 or 4 days.

    I know it's more expensive than doing it yourself, but for the first time, it really is the best way to come to grips with the area, the roads & more importantly, the local driving styles. The latter is not to be taken lightly ........

    Enjoy - I sure do.
     
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  3. Deano747

    Deano747 Ol'Timer

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    Sorry, in the above I meant leaving your passport isn't a problem. I wouldn't do it with most scooter places you find in every street, but a large recognised hire place is secure.

    It is done daily by a large number of tourists.
     
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  4. blackb15

    blackb15 Ol'Timer

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    I’m from the UK I agree above comments ,my own experience is I did leave my passport with CP bike hire and Pops many many times and all ok but it’s a personal decision.
    The riding his fantastic here I’m over for 2 months
    Safe riding
     
  5. DavidFL

    DavidFL Administrator
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    #5 DavidFL, Feb 6, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
    Some shops may accept a 10,000 baht+ deposit or a credit card.
    But honestly it isn't a problem leaving your passport with a reputable shop.
    I actually tell shops, no passport no bike, because I've seen a few scams run in the past by guys doing a runner, crashes & killing someone, bike gone missing (sold in Myanmar), plus trying to cover up crash damage. I side with the shops, they put up with a lot of crap from dodgy riders - just a few spoil it for everyone else as usual.

    I used to vouch for some guys, but got burnt one or twice = never again.

    Look after your bike & take it back to the shop in the same condition & it isn't a problem.

    Crash it, break it & you pay for it.

    The rental shops listed on GTR are all ok.
    Renting Bikes
     
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  6. John Aero

    John Aero Ol'Timer

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    Billy I would tend to agree with Deano to do a tour - you will be trying to assimilate Thailand (which can be confusing!) as well are riding unfamiliar types of road and "odd" general traffic all in a very short time frame. It would be a good tester trip for own tour later. Yes the others are right that the big bike places are Ok with passport - the scams, which I never experienced are usually scooter rentals.
     
  7. Billy Mill

    Billy Mill New Member

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    Thanks for the advice guys. you've really given me some food for thought.
    I appreciate the readily available pictures of great curving roads only tell half the story, and reading some of the threads on here about driving styles and road conditions as well as David's recent experience across the boarder helps to give the other side of the story.
    As bikers we all know and accept a certain level of risk and do what we can to minimise those risks. I have to admit I didn't fully appreciate the full extent of the break it you bought it rule.
    I can't disagree with Deano, I have looked at the organised tours and they are very attractive but mainly because of what we want to see and the time constraints we've put on ourselves the tours don't really meet our needs. Don't get me wrong my plans don't involve flying round everywhere at silly speeds, just some gentle pottering.
    So what will I do? Not sure yet, I think I'll happily trust the shops recommend here, and arm myself with an extra dose of respect for the local roads. I'll limit myself to hiring a smaller bike (CB500x anyone?) and do a few shorter rides from Chiang Mai taking in Doi inthanon and the Samong loop.
    What ever I choose thanks again guys, I am looking forward to visiting.
     
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  8. blackb15

    blackb15 Ol'Timer

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    I hired a honda 500x from C &P and ride to and round Laos it was superb for that trip and I’m quite a big guy,your probably best to pre book.
    Safe riding
     

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