I love my big shiny helmet.

theantlion

Member
Jan 16, 2007
17
0
0
After returning from my journey North to Chaing Saen, I upgraded to a bigger bike, (the 125 tourture machine just did not cut it). I am now riding around on a 250 RX and I want its children, it is more fun than the Ukranian under 16 pentathletes team. I have been burning around the Mae Hong Song trail kicking up dust since I got on it five days ago. Of course with this new found power (cue evil laugh) comes a new found need to protect myself and I dutifully invested in thirty condoms, a luminous jacket that makes me look like a cock (no the fighting sort) and a helmet. I was told that of all items the helmet is the most essential and any damage to it can render it useless. So I dutifully bought a decent one and I have been extremely careful with it taking care not to drop and always ensuring it is not somewhere it can easily fall. Today, after visiting the Karen Long Kneck village outside Mae Hong Song, I finally did the unthinkable and dropped it on the ground. this has put a number of scratches in it and left wondering if I should replace it? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

SilverhawkUSA

Ol'Timer
Mar 15, 2003
1,528
10
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www.daveearly.com
Helmets get dropped all the time. Other than damage to the nice shiney finish, it is unlikely you did anything that would structually damage it. Next time try putting one of those condoms over it as kind of an elastic helmet protector....
 

Pikey

www.tbbtours.com
Silverhawk is 100% correct. I'd be more worried if my inbuilt helmet started dro(o)ping, although I understand that there is a fix for that too.... [;)]

Seriously, you're gonna get scrapes on a lid over time but any direct impact of any consequence (i.e. with your head inside and you get up, dazed and wondering about, going "oh f*ck"), would warrant a new lid in my book.

Cheers,

Pikey.
 

daewoo

Ol'Timer
Dec 6, 2005
821
13
18
I won't tow the Silverhawk line entirely...

Only you know how hard you droped the helmet, onto what sort of surface, and what sort of a sound it made...

The structure of a helmet is damaged every time it is dropped... I just look at it in percentages... say a minor drop damaged the helmet by 1%... that means that it would protect you for 99% of the most serious get-offs... if it is a 100% terrible stack, your luck is up...

I look at cfheap helmets the same way... they will protect you for mishaps up to say 70% as serious as a more expensive helmet...

well, thats my 2 satangs worth anyway,

Cheers,
Daewoo
 

SilverhawkUSA

Ol'Timer
Mar 15, 2003
1,528
10
0
www.daveearly.com
Did a "Google Search" on dropping helmets. Of course received conflicting information. The manufacturers, probably protecting their liability, want you to replace them. Study groups say it may not be necessary. Many factors and opinions just as there are on what is a good helmet. Expensive does not always mean better. Room for another debate (geez, it seems that's all I start lately).

Here are a couple of conflicting excerpts. Do a search yourself and you can read until your eyes blur...[8)]

quote:


http://www.roadsafety.mccofnsw.org.au/a/74.html
What if you drop your helmet?
There is also a lot of fear mongering about dropped helmets.
This is a problem because no one can ever guarantee that a helmet has not sustained any damage in a drop. How many 'little' drops affect the helmet' s ability to protect the wearer in the event of that one major impact?
Manufacturers and safety authorities are bound to err on the side of caution and to advise that the helmet should be replaced if it has sustained an impact. This is because they cannot take the risk of saying 'that it is alright to re-use it after the drop'.
Use common sense
If you drop your helmet or it fell off your bike (stationary), then there would be little chance of damaging the outer shell or the inner shell which actually absorbs the energy on impact. However, if you throw your helmet against a wall or down the road in a fit of rage, then you could damage the outer shell and affected the helmet's ability to protect you (Gibson, 2004

http://www.hjchelmets.com/helmet_usage.htm
Helmet Replacement (All Models)

Although your HJC Helmet is constructed with the best materials available to offer a long-lasting product, it will eventually need to be replaced. Immediately replace your helmet if:

• It has suffered an impact. Your helmet is only designed for ONE impact. An impact may fracture the outer shell or compress the impact absorbing liner. You may not be able to detect this damage. Any impact in a crash or a drop from as low as 4 feet is enough to damage your helmet.

• The shell, lining, or retention system is damaged. The helmet shell, the impact absorbing lining, and the retention system must be in good condition to provide you with the most protection
Even if your helmet has not been damaged, it needs to be replaced every 3 to 5 years depending on how much you use it. Over time, UV rays and adhesive and component aging will damage your helmet. Wearing a damaged helmet may increase your risk of serious injury or death in an accident.
If you are unsure if you need to replace your helmet, contact HJC America before using your helmet again.







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Tomo

Ol'Timer
Sep 13, 2006
93
0
0
We visited a large bike shop and bought my girlfriend a new Shoei last year as the old one was oldish and cheapish. She loves the Shoei so that's all good.

Anyway, the helmet shopkeeper asked if we wanted the old one and we said no. He then gripped it by the chin guard and in a quite athletic sprint across the shop, swang it overarm style and smashed it down on the concrete step...!!

I expected major damage (possibly to the step..) but to my amazement there was barely a mark on the lid. The finish was damaged and there was a small indentation but no internal damage.

What he went on to point out however was that the big difference between the new one and the old one was the polystyrene liner. On inspection, the liner in the Shoei was soft and spongy - the old one hard and unyielding from many years wear and compacting.

In the event of an impact we all know that a major part of the problem is not damage to the outside of the skull but the brain cannoning off the inside - this could clearly be reduced by an energy absorbing layer around the skull. A solid liner in your helmet will render your trusty old lid only partially effective.

So post waffle...IMHO I would say that a drop from a bike say, would do nothing other than scratch the posh paint job and make you stamp about a bit cursing loudly!

But I stand to be corrected..