2013 Honda CBR500/CB500R/CB500X

zandtao

Active Member
Nov 27, 2012
27
0
0
HERE IS THE EMAIL:-

Subject:
Owner manual for CB500X

Dear Mr. Bill,

Thank you for contacting us, Honda BigWing.
Regarding your request for the English version of owner manual, currently we are in the process of
putting the Temporary English version manual together, which, expected to be complete approximately by the end of March.
The manual should be available for collection at all Honda BigWing showroom from April onward.

If you have any further questions or suggestions, please do not be hesitate to contact us.

Your Sincerely,

Vachara Leegomonchai (Nam-Mon)

Business Planning / BigWing Department
New Business Planning Division
A.P.Honda Co.,Ltd.
149 Rodrangkhao road, Samrong-Tai,
Phrapradaeng, Samutprakan 10130,
Thailand
 

zandtao

Active Member
Nov 27, 2012
27
0
0
Apologies for misleading anyone. Mine is cb500X. Although I thought they were referring to all 3 bikes, they must have just been talking about the 500x - manual in April as the other two manuals were already available.
 

SilverhawkUSA

Ol'Timer
Mar 15, 2003
1,528
9
0
www.daveearly.com
zandtao;289432 wrote: Apologies for misleading anyone. Mine is cb500X. Although I thought they were referring to all 3 bikes, they must have just been talking about the 500x - manual in April as the other two manuals were already available.
No problem. There can't be much difference in the manuals other than a few of the specs. BTW, did you guys know that each of the 500 models has different colored lights in the instrument panel? At least that is what the manager told me. :wink:
 

KZ25

Ol'Timer
Nov 19, 2011
805
0
0
I remember reading the same in the PDF manual for the CBR250R - 12,000 km. But I recommend applying common sense. ;-)
 

Rainbow

Member
Feb 15, 2013
14
0
0
I hired one to sus them out as a thought to maybe buying one!
We did the most of the Mae Hong Son Loop on a Honda CB500X.
The route was much “Phil”OZified with GT Dave (my apologies for calling you Phil – BTW) over liquid refreshments and it was recommended to do it clockwise since we had only 4 days and important to cover as much ground as possible on day 1. I thought, more theoretically, it would be more off-camber and since I didn’t own the bike I wasn’t fussed about scrubbing tyres and wanted to see how much they chewed up.
Honda have 3 variants – an “F” which doesn’t mean faring (it’s naked as), an “R” that doesn’t mean road (the sports version – and maybe “R” means race and the “X” version. Thinking “X” might mean dual purpose I was looking forward to a 19” front wheel, but NO, it is just a slightly more sit up version than the lie down types.
Leaving CM at 11.30 a squirt south down to just before Chomthong on the dual carriageway allowed the opportunity to roll the bike across lanes to get some feel for change of direction in a safe environment and notice that 1[sup]st[/sup] was good till 54 and 2[sup]nd[/sup] to 94 k’s. Gave the bike a feed of 91 gasohol (wished the filler cap was hinged but instead wondered where to stick it once unlocking it) and turned right onto the 1009.
At Doi Inthanon vision was down to 20 metres at places and with only 15.9 degrees on the thermometer going uphills was OK but downhills the bike behaved like a pig. The rolling off and back on the throttle was very lurchy (is there such a word, and if not, how about lungy?). The soft front end would have won silver at any Olympics for its behaviour when getting off the gas and gently rolling back on it felt like a gun going off and Carl Lewis getting off the blocks – maybe tolerable for rider as I’m expecting it but “no good” for any pillion. Add the fact that the back brake was less than ideal (maybe previous riders had glazed the pad/disc combo up in the 7000k’s the bike had travelled before I sat my fat **** on it – and maybe not, I doubt I’ll ever find that one out) meant relying too much on a front going downhill on a wet mudded up cold road. Faaaaaark, a GS safari on tar!!!!!
Talking about suspension, it is not a small bike at all and sat the 2 of us with luggage tied on behind comfortably. I’m 87kg and with approx 10kg in a bag, I also carted my default preload – Thip weighs in at 47kg with a high centre of gravity J and she likes to cart the hair dryer everywhere she goes so allow a total of 160kg for the 2 of us. The rear was naturally doeee as a result. On 3 occasions during the trip (and all on lefthanders) I also felt the bike drop away rapidly. Whether it wanted to get into the ideal racing line or was on the verge of a low side (I’m not sure) but each time I stood the bike back up easily and shook the smell out of the pants. Thip said the pillion seat was more comfortable than the Versys and heaps better than the ER6.
Buffeting wise, I’m used to big sooky screens so I was somewhat surprised that the small screen offered chest and neck protection, and I’m 5’11”.
Instrument panel wise, the clock is also on and the tacho is in bars in increments of 200rpm – I prefer a dial for accuracy. There is a mode switch that allows you to switch from total k’s, to trip “A” k’s, then trip “B” k’s – all good, then instant fuel (a great idea but with a minimum 7 second time delay is about as useless as an ashtray), then average fuel usage trip “A”, then fuel used trip “A” – and I wished the last 2 were independent and not linked to trip “A”.
After a stopover at Mae Chaem, the 2[sup]nd[/sup] day was then west to Khun Yuam and north to Mae Hong Son. In the section 20-40k south of MHS the tightness of the bends you cannot see the exit of until after the apex, the undulations mid corner, the potholes, oncoming traffic on wrong side of road meant we couldn’t shake a Click from our tail so it just goes to show that power does not necessarily prevail.
We stayed 2 nights in MHS allowing us a day to explore the area. We took in the Long Neck Karens’ just past Nai Soi. On the dirt, trying to ride at anything less than 18kph was piggish unless you were walking the bike along without throttle – which does 8kph in 1[sup]st[/sup] and 13kph in 2[sup]nd[/sup]. We decided against taking the big pig up some snotty rutted out dirt track into their refugee camp but would have taken the Wave I have back at Sak Lek. We then rode up to Rak Thai and quenched our thirst with some Oolong #17 tea before heading back to MHS for our 3[sup]rd[/sup] night away.
On the way back to CM on day 4, we had a look at the Pong Duead Geyser in the Huai Nam Dang National Park.
Whilst it seems like I’ve just written a critique about the bike – On the positive side it has a reasonable headlight (but wished the high beam switch kept the low beam on as well), the clutch was easy to use, the front brake had a good feel, the oggy knobs were big enough to rest your knees against with very little vibration and we could both walk after a long day in the saddle. We recorded over 26kms/litre so it is a bike I would ride the gently undulating and sweeping areas of Issan or as an inter province express between Phitsanulok and CM or BKK. Get in into mountains or the tight stuff and it behaves like a big bike does – and nowhere near as nimble as the Wave. I therefore kept my 200k+ Baht in my pocket and instead bought some aftermarket YSS shocks for the Wave.
 

johngooding

Ol'Timer
Sep 4, 2007
1,192
15
38
Appreciate the detailed and interesting report. The Wave will always be more nimble on tight roads than any real motorbike, but surely with 2 up and luggage, it must be struggling on the longer straighter stretches.
Maybe the new Honda Forza 300cc scooter may offer you the best of both worlds at a price between the Wave and the 500?
 

nikster

Ol'Timer
Nov 7, 2007
659
0
0
I am not sure riding with a pillion is a good test for any bike... the Versys is a completely different bike with pillion on, and so is I am sure the CBX500.

The rapid drop away in the curves is due to the Scorpion Trails - they're a bit flat, and they have a tendency to do that. I found it way better on the CBX500 than on the Versys for some reason though. The CBX bent into corners super easy and felt rock solid even when leaning it all the way down. I never had the feeling it would give out, no wobble, etc. Impressive handling - so as long as the road is smooth. The suspension is cheap - it's similar to an ER-6n, and nowhere near the Versys.

Not sure what you're saying about the throttle - my feeling was this bike is made for smooth cruising that that's what it does best.

Power/torque loss vs the ER6 *very* noticeable. That's actually the main reason I wouldn't get one. Everything else was fine but the thing has no power. I got ~20 kpl, so different riding style for sure 555
 

Rainbow

Member
Feb 15, 2013
14
0
0
Thanks, Nikster.
Yes, shod with Scorpion Trails. Must remember never to buy them in future.

nikster;290700 wrote: I am not sure riding with a pillion is a good test for any bike... the Versys is a completely different bike with pillion on, and so is I am sure the CBX500.

The rapid drop away in the curves is due to the Scorpion Trails - they're a bit flat, and they have a tendency to do that. I found it way better on the CBX500 than on the Versys for some reason though. The CBX bent into corners super easy and felt rock solid even when leaning it all the way down. I never had the feeling it would give out, no wobble, etc. Impressive handling - so as long as the road is smooth. The suspension is cheap - it's similar to an ER-6n, and nowhere near the Versys.

Not sure what you're saying about the throttle - my feeling was this bike is made for smooth cruising that that's what it does best.

Power/torque loss vs the ER6 *very* noticeable. That's actually the main reason I wouldn't get one. Everything else was fine but the thing has no power. I got ~20 kpl, so different riding style for sure 555
 

Rainbow

Member
Feb 15, 2013
14
0
0
Thanks, John.
Had a look at the LT (Lite Truck) Scooter and its other downsize is 14" wheels - no, thanks.

johngooding;290686 wrote: Appreciate the detailed and interesting report. The Wave will always be more nimble on tight roads than any real motorbike, but surely with 2 up and luggage, it must be struggling on the longer straighter stretches.
Maybe the new Honda Forza 300cc scooter may offer you the best of both worlds at a price between the Wave and the 500?
 

lordofthedreadz

Ol'Timer
Jun 13, 2010
85
0
6
Rainbow;290682 wrote: I hired one to sus them out as a thought to maybe buying one!
We did the most of the Mae Hong Son Loop on a Honda CB500X.
The route was much “Phil”OZified with GT Dave (my apologies for calling you Phil – BTW) over liquid refreshments and it was recommended to do it clockwise since we had only 4 days and important to cover as much ground as possible on day 1. I thought, more theoretically, it would be more off-camber and since I didn’t own the bike I wasn’t fussed about scrubbing tyres and wanted to see how much they chewed up.
Honda have 3 variants – an “F” which doesn’t mean faring (it’s naked as), an “R” that doesn’t mean road (the sports version – and maybe “R” means race and the “X” version. Thinking “X” might mean dual purpose I was looking forward to a 19” front wheel, but NO, it is just a slightly more sit up version than the lie down types.
Leaving CM at 11.30 a squirt south down to just before Chomthong on the dual carriageway allowed the opportunity to roll the bike across lanes to get some feel for change of direction in a safe environment and notice that 1[sup]st[/sup] was good till 54 and 2[sup]nd[/sup] to 94 k’s. Gave the bike a feed of 91 gasohol (wished the filler cap was hinged but instead wondered where to stick it once unlocking it) and turned right onto the 1009.
At Doi Inthanon vision was down to 20 metres at places and with only 15.9 degrees on the thermometer going uphills was OK but downhills the bike behaved like a pig. The rolling off and back on the throttle was very lurchy (is there such a word, and if not, how about lungy?). The soft front end would have won silver at any Olympics for its behaviour when getting off the gas and gently rolling back on it felt like a gun going off and Carl Lewis getting off the blocks – maybe tolerable for rider as I’m expecting it but “no good” for any pillion. Add the fact that the back brake was less than ideal (maybe previous riders had glazed the pad/disc combo up in the 7000k’s the bike had travelled before I sat my fat **** on it – and maybe not, I doubt I’ll ever find that one out) meant relying too much on a front going downhill on a wet mudded up cold road. Faaaaaark, a GS safari on tar!!!!!
Talking about suspension, it is not a small bike at all and sat the 2 of us with luggage tied on behind comfortably. I’m 87kg and with approx 10kg in a bag, I also carted my default preload – Thip weighs in at 47kg with a high centre of gravity J and she likes to cart the hair dryer everywhere she goes so allow a total of 160kg for the 2 of us. The rear was naturally doeee as a result. On 3 occasions during the trip (and all on lefthanders) I also felt the bike drop away rapidly. Whether it wanted to get into the ideal racing line or was on the verge of a low side (I’m not sure) but each time I stood the bike back up easily and shook the smell out of the pants. Thip said the pillion seat was more comfortable than the Versys and heaps better than the ER6.
Buffeting wise, I’m used to big sooky screens so I was somewhat surprised that the small screen offered chest and neck protection, and I’m 5’11”.
Instrument panel wise, the clock is also on and the tacho is in bars in increments of 200rpm – I prefer a dial for accuracy. There is a mode switch that allows you to switch from total k’s, to trip “A” k’s, then trip “B” k’s – all good, then instant fuel (a great idea but with a minimum 7 second time delay is about as useless as an ashtray), then average fuel usage trip “A”, then fuel used trip “A” – and I wished the last 2 were independent and not linked to trip “A”.
After a stopover at Mae Chaem, the 2[sup]nd[/sup] day was then west to Khun Yuam and north to Mae Hong Son. In the section 20-40k south of MHS the tightness of the bends you cannot see the exit of until after the apex, the undulations mid corner, the potholes, oncoming traffic on wrong side of road meant we couldn’t shake a Click from our tail so it just goes to show that power does not necessarily prevail.
We stayed 2 nights in MHS allowing us a day to explore the area. We took in the Long Neck Karens’ just past Nai Soi. On the dirt, trying to ride at anything less than 18kph was piggish unless you were walking the bike along without throttle – which does 8kph in 1[sup]st[/sup] and 13kph in 2[sup]nd[/sup]. We decided against taking the big pig up some snotty rutted out dirt track into their refugee camp but would have taken the Wave I have back at Sak Lek. We then rode up to Rak Thai and quenched our thirst with some Oolong #17 tea before heading back to MHS for our 3[sup]rd[/sup] night away.
On the way back to CM on day 4, we had a look at the Pong Duead Geyser in the Huai Nam Dang National Park.
Whilst it seems like I’ve just written a critique about the bike – On the positive side it has a reasonable headlight (but wished the high beam switch kept the low beam on as well), the clutch was easy to use, the front brake had a good feel, the oggy knobs were big enough to rest your knees against with very little vibration and we could both walk after a long day in the saddle. We recorded over 26kms/litre so it is a bike I would ride the gently undulating and sweeping areas of Issan or as an inter province express between Phitsanulok and CM or BKK. Get in into mountains or the tight stuff and it behaves like a big bike does – and nowhere near as nimble as the Wave. I therefore kept my 200k+ Baht in my pocket and instead bought some aftermarket YSS shocks for the Wave.
As much as I can tell the Wave is a great bike, but even if you do put a pair of YSS shocks will not match the comfort of a bigger bike, the CB500 serie is not meant to race and has nowhere close the raw power of an ER6 or a Versys but it is also reasonably cheaper both on the price tag and on the gas usage.

I did not experience any of the issues you listed with the CB500X I rented and I am also quite fat and my wife on the back is not a lightweight Thai either, I went to Samoeng under the rain and it was a very pleasant ride, actually I was surprised how nimble it was for a 500cc.

Even if you pay me I will never go to a long trip on a Wave, no matter what aftermarket stuff you throw in because it is a mopped and not a motorbike, if you are looking for nimble you can also use a normal bycicle, this is as nimble as you can get, but if you are looking for something comfortable that can carry 2 people and some luggage while keeping the pleasure of riding a bike (I personally have no pleasure whatsoever riding a Wave, this is just a mean of transportation) the CB500 serie is a very reasonable choice in my opinion.

Again it is whatever rocks you boat I saw plenty of people being happy with Phantoms in Thailand while for me that was the most boring bike I ever rode, on the other hand a Er6 is a little bit overpowered for Thai roads in my opinion (170kph on my first ride without even noticing I was going fast), making the CB500X the perfect choice for someone like me.
 

Marmite

Ol'Timer
Sep 13, 2010
78
51
18
Rainbow;290682 wrote: I hired one to sus them out as a thought to maybe buying one!
We did the most of the Mae Hong Son Loop on a Honda CB500X.
The route was much “Phil”OZified with GT Dave (my apologies for calling you Phil – BTW) over liquid refreshments and it was recommended to do it clockwise since we had only 4 days and important to cover as much ground as possible on day 1. I thought, more theoretically, it would be more off-camber and since I didn’t own the bike I wasn’t fussed about scrubbing tyres and wanted to see how much they chewed up.
Honda have 3 variants – an “F” which doesn’t mean faring (it’s naked as), an “R” that doesn’t mean road (the sports version – and maybe “R” means race and the “X” version. Thinking “X” might mean dual purpose I was looking forward to a 19” front wheel, but NO, it is just a slightly more sit up version than the lie down types.
Leaving CM at 11.30 a squirt south down to just before Chomthong on the dual carriageway allowed the opportunity to roll the bike across lanes to get some feel for change of direction in a safe environment and notice that 1[sup]st[/sup] was good till 54 and 2[sup]nd[/sup] to 94 k’s. Gave the bike a feed of 91 gasohol (wished the filler cap was hinged but instead wondered where to stick it once unlocking it) and turned right onto the 1009.
At Doi Inthanon vision was down to 20 metres at places and with only 15.9 degrees on the thermometer going uphills was OK but downhills the bike behaved like a pig. The rolling off and back on the throttle was very lurchy (is there such a word, and if not, how about lungy?). The soft front end would have won silver at any Olympics for its behaviour when getting off the gas and gently rolling back on it felt like a gun going off and Carl Lewis getting off the blocks – maybe tolerable for rider as I’m expecting it but “no good” for any pillion. Add the fact that the back brake was less than ideal (maybe previous riders had glazed the pad/disc combo up in the 7000k’s the bike had travelled before I sat my fat **** on it – and maybe not, I doubt I’ll ever find that one out) meant relying too much on a front going downhill on a wet mudded up cold road. Faaaaaark, a GS safari on tar!!!!!
Talking about suspension, it is not a small bike at all and sat the 2 of us with luggage tied on behind comfortably. I’m 87kg and with approx 10kg in a bag, I also carted my default preload – Thip weighs in at 47kg with a high centre of gravity J and she likes to cart the hair dryer everywhere she goes so allow a total of 160kg for the 2 of us. The rear was naturally doeee as a result. On 3 occasions during the trip (and all on lefthanders) I also felt the bike drop away rapidly. Whether it wanted to get into the ideal racing line or was on the verge of a low side (I’m not sure) but each time I stood the bike back up easily and shook the smell out of the pants. Thip said the pillion seat was more comfortable than the Versys and heaps better than the ER6.
Buffeting wise, I’m used to big sooky screens so I was somewhat surprised that the small screen offered chest and neck protection, and I’m 5’11”.
Instrument panel wise, the clock is also on and the tacho is in bars in increments of 200rpm – I prefer a dial for accuracy. There is a mode switch that allows you to switch from total k’s, to trip “A” k’s, then trip “B” k’s – all good, then instant fuel (a great idea but with a minimum 7 second time delay is about as useless as an ashtray), then average fuel usage trip “A”, then fuel used trip “A” – and I wished the last 2 were independent and not linked to trip “A”.
After a stopover at Mae Chaem, the 2[sup]nd[/sup] day was then west to Khun Yuam and north to Mae Hong Son. In the section 20-40k south of MHS the tightness of the bends you cannot see the exit of until after the apex, the undulations mid corner, the potholes, oncoming traffic on wrong side of road meant we couldn’t shake a Click from our tail so it just goes to show that power does not necessarily prevail.
We stayed 2 nights in MHS allowing us a day to explore the area. We took in the Long Neck Karens’ just past Nai Soi. On the dirt, trying to ride at anything less than 18kph was piggish unless you were walking the bike along without throttle – which does 8kph in 1[sup]st[/sup] and 13kph in 2[sup]nd[/sup]. We decided against taking the big pig up some snotty rutted out dirt track into their refugee camp but would have taken the Wave I have back at Sak Lek. We then rode up to Rak Thai and quenched our thirst with some Oolong #17 tea before heading back to MHS for our 3[sup]rd[/sup] night away.
On the way back to CM on day 4, we had a look at the Pong Duead Geyser in the Huai Nam Dang National Park.
Whilst it seems like I’ve just written a critique about the bike – On the positive side it has a reasonable headlight (but wished the high beam switch kept the low beam on as well), the clutch was easy to use, the front brake had a good feel, the oggy knobs were big enough to rest your knees against with very little vibration and we could both walk after a long day in the saddle. We recorded over 26kms/litre so it is a bike I would ride the gently undulating and sweeping areas of Issan or as an inter province express between Phitsanulok and CM or BKK. Get in into mountains or the tight stuff and it behaves like a big bike does – and nowhere near as nimble as the Wave. I therefore kept my 200k+ Baht in my pocket and instead bought some aftermarket YSS shocks for the Wave.
Interesting report.

I have both a CB500F and a new 125i Wave. I must admit to thinking the Wave feels completely unstable and archaic compared to the CB. I hate riding the thing now (luckily, I don't have to).

I do agree that you have to be very careful with the throttle as it is a bit on/off. I've adjusted the play as there was loads from the factory and I only like a couple of mm.
 

KZ25

Ol'Timer
Nov 19, 2011
805
0
0
Good review, but when I read that it's not as nimble as the Wave I was surprised. The Wave weighs only about 100kg so of course it is nimbler but obviously it does not compare in any way to the CB500.
If you would have compared the CB500 to the CBR250 or CRF250M or even CBR150R I would have understood.
But if you are happy with a Wave 125 why not save 200K! :)
 

Eddie The Eagle

Ol'Timer
Sep 8, 2009
147
0
16
You Guys out there with the new CB500, keep an eye on your oil level, my oil window was empty, took 1 pint to bring it up to level, no oil leaks .... so in 2600K 1 pint gone ??? it could be to do with bedding in process ?? ..
Time will tell :)
 

TonyBKK

Ol'Timer
Dec 27, 2007
3,854
11
38
Eddie The Eagle;293852 wrote: You Guys out there with the new CB500, keep an eye on your oil level, my oil window was empty, took 1 pint to bring it up to level, no oil leaks .... so in 2600K 1 pint gone ??? it could be to do with bedding in process ?? ..
Time will tell :)
Until the new rings are fully seated one can expect a brand new engine to burn a very small amount of oil during break in, but the amount of oil loss you describe is not normal at all.

If I were you I'd take the bike to the nearest big wing right away and insist they determine the cause of the oil loss.

A few question- how did you break the bike in? What kind of oil did you use for break in? How many km on the bike now?

When you start the bike do you see any white smoke from the exhaust?

For you to lose this much oil I would hazard a guess that you have a badly leaking intake gasket or stuck / broken / missing cylinder ring(s).

Curious to know what the problen is, please keep us posted and good luck!
 

Eddie The Eagle

Ol'Timer
Sep 8, 2009
147
0
16
TonyBKK;293855 wrote: Until the new rings are fully seated one can expect a brand new engine to burn a very small amount of oil during break in, but the amount of oil loss you describe is not normal at all.

If I were you I'd take the bike to the nearest big wing right away and insist they determine the cause of the oil loss.

A few question- how did you break the bike in? What kind of oil did you use for break in? How many km on the bike now?

When you start the bike do you see any white smoke from the exhaust?

For you to lose this much oil I would hazard a guess that you have a badly leaking intake gasket or stuck / broken / missing cylinder ring(s).

Curious to know what the problen is, please keep us posted and good luck!
im curious too, no smoke .. goes like a train, no probs .. will keep my eye on it
 

KZ25

Ol'Timer
Nov 19, 2011
805
0
0
I've read a similar post on CBR500riders - a guy had to refill almost a quart after 1,000 km; that's way too high oil consumption for a new engine.
 

SilverhawkUSA

Ol'Timer
Mar 15, 2003
1,528
9
0
www.daveearly.com
Checked mine after reading this. It is going in for it's 6,000km checkup on Thursday (now has about 6,400). It was about a pint low. So that would be in the 3,000km since it's last checkup at Big Wing where they used Synthetic. Always the possibility of not being filled to the proper level at the check up as I didn't double check it at the time.