Another Africa Twin for sale - a silver 1997

daewoo

Ol'Timer
Dec 6, 2005
821
13
18
Alan,

In Thailand there is more than one way to skin a cat. To import and get a large capacity motorbike on fully legit plates following all the rules is a very frustrating, time consuming, costly exercise, and often fruitless exercise, as you will find out if you try and do it (or read Ian Bungy's threads on trying to go the right thing).

A second option is to use a recycled book, which is about 95% legit, and how almost all big bikes are done, and probably Rhiekel's.

Please just accept that this is how things MUST be done in Thailand at the moment. It creates some difficulties when transferring ownership, but nothing like the problems faced if you try to do it 100% by the book.

GT-Rider welcomes all members, and we all hope that you will ride and post lots of reports and become part of the community, but questioning the honesty of a long standing and active member isn't the best way to start out.

Cheers,
Daewoo
 

Harry Sheene

Active Member
Sep 14, 2007
28
0
0
Wow......what a load of.....

Robert, always enjoyed your posts, so thank you, and good luck selling the AT! It looks a real beaut!
 

CBR

Member
Dec 20, 2006
6
0
0
You know up in the north of Thailand having a big bike without the green book is no big deal. The cops have never asked me for it. Also not having number plates is no biggie either.
Be cool everyone ;)
 

Gus HD

Member
Jan 26, 2006
13
0
0
quote:

Originally posted by pikey

Robert, in "proper English" a wide boy is also known as a "lairy git". I am pleased to confirm you are neither and am happy that Rhodie has painted the picture in plain English(?) as to how different/difficult it can sometimes be here with big bikes. Some people eh......? [;)]

Cheers,

Pikey.








Geez I was doing ok at understanding all this until Pikey put his translation on it. Thought it was supposed to be your mother tongue too Geofrey[:D]
 

Gus HD

Member
Jan 26, 2006
13
0
0
quote:

Originally posted by alan

but I will always try to offer advice for those honest people, who might not have had experience in any of the things I have had experience in, in the hope that it will help them not to get involved in a possible future problem.
Alan Corvey








If you going to offer advice on such matters you need to first understand the issues before you can start offering advice.

Most posters here have plenty of experience with registering big bikes and I suggest you take it on notice that they know what they are talking about.

Maybe you would do better to at least listen to their arguments before offering advice on something you obviously don't understand.
 

rhiekel

Ol'Timer
Feb 23, 2003
304
1
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Don't worry Gus HD. When I saw Pikey the other day I took him to task for trying to explain one mysterious slang word, "wide boy " with another even more mysterious slang word, "lairy git". [:0] Given the choice I think I would prefer the "wide boy" one, as the "lairy git" one seems a bit more menacing....Hopefully in the future when these slang words pop up, we can get the more common sense explanation. [:)] [:)] [:)] [:)]
 

monsterman

Ol'Timer
Oct 17, 2006
1,830
37
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WIDE BOY = Market trader with low morals and a cheating attitude

LAIRY GIT = aggressive guy with low morals not to be trusted.
 

mikethevigo

Ol'Timer
Jan 19, 2007
133
0
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quote:

Originally posted by monsterman

WIDE BOY = Market trader with low morals and a cheating attitude

LAIRY GIT = aggressive guy with low morals not to be trusted.






Del Boy and Phil Mitchell !
 

monsterman

Ol'Timer
Oct 17, 2006
1,830
37
48
I have owned 8 big bike personally over the years all legally registered , only had trouble with the harley which had a Chantaburi stolen book which cost me 40,000 to get fixed in BKK to a new book.
When running the shop i saw 68 Harleys and 5 Buells and 2 Triumphs get full new books a registrations in 3 years most took 3-6 months to register but 4 had problems which meant they took up to a year to register legally.

Some shop use recyled books , which seems more prevailent with jap bike and the provinces not Bangkok or pattaya .
 

Tom Forde

Ol'Timer
Jul 6, 2004
355
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gee Robert,
You didn't have that much trouble dealing with that Cambodian War Lord that tried to sell you the dodgy Chinese Hotel down in Sianoukville.
Should send the pommy buggers down there if they want to see some dodgy deals.

Cheers
Tom
 

KZ

Ol'Timer
Aug 20, 2003
1,084
0
0
If you buy a bike in a different state than the one you want to register it in, it's a good idea to go first to the Department of Motor vehicles in the state where you bought it. Then it's faster in your state.
Bought a bike in Phuket, rode it home, went to my DMV, took them two months to send the paperwork back to Phuket and to get it back.
 

alan

New Member
Nov 7, 2007
4
0
0
I see some people here like to flout the law and seem to get away with it, and even say that 'you have to look at all the issues' but, honesty is still honesty, or is it ok to be dishonest because everybody else does it so it's 'the way things are done here??
But, you are either honest or not honest, there are no two ways about it, and yes, I have taken some time to read through some of the posts on this site. They do show how breaking the law can be done and got away with, and also cases where a stolen bike with a 'worked on' registration book, has been found out about by the police, and the bike confiscated.
My posting is only to show to people that they should be careful when dealing with information given on different internet sites, and I am aware of people who have been fooled into a false sense of security, and paid the price later.
If you were caught doing something dodgy with vehicle registration, and ended up in front of a magistrate, would he accept the excuse, sorry your worship, but some people here, and on the internet told me that its ok to 'work on a book', it's the Thai way. Would the magistrate say, ok then, you are free to go. I very much doubt it. You would likely end up with a conviction, and loose the vehicle, plus pay a fine, or maybe even go to jail.

Imagine if the shoe was on the other foot, and one day you went out to your garage, only to find your bike had been stolen, would you then think, well, ok, it's gone and somebody might end up riding it around, with their own 'worked on' book, or maybe it would even end up in another country, Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia, and again you have lost something you enjoy using, have perhaps saved long and hard for, and perhaps even paid a lot of money for, and somebody is now using it, not caring where it came from.
Breaking the law, just because other people are doing it, is really no excuse, and can hardly be used if and when you get caught.
As I say, I am only giving a warning to people to be careful, as any responsible person should do, in any situation.
I will be buying a bike later this year, and of course I will be making sure it is fully legal, even if this means having the police do a thorough check on it, because I certainly don't want to be dragged off to court trying to explain why I did not do something legally.

Alan Corvey
 

DavidFL

Administrator
Staff member
Subscribed
Jan 16, 2003
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alan wrote: As I say, I am only giving a warning to people to be careful, as any responsible person should do, in any situation.
I will be buying a bike later this year, and of course I will be making sure it is fully legal, even if this means having the police do a thorough check on it, because I certainly don't want to be dragged off to court trying to explain why I did not do something legally.

Alan Corvey
Alan
Good advise - be careful as any responsible person should do.
Best of luck buying a bike & being totally 100% legal.
We look forward to your road & trip reports when you start riding here.